Brahms: Symphony, Issue 1

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 23, 1997 - Music - 115 pages
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Brahms's First Symphony has been hailed as Beethoven's Tenth. Its controversial status and relationship in the Beethovenian tradition is considered alongside other important issues in the early reception history of this key work in the symphonic repertory. David Brodbeck begins with an account of the lengthy genesis and complicated background to the writing of the symphony, before providing a thorough critical reading of the work, movement by movement. In particular, Professor Brodbeck reveals a dense web of extra-compositional allusions--references in the music to works by J. S. Bach, Beethoven, Schubert, and Robert Schumann--in which, the author argues, much meaning resides.
 

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Contents

Frustrated efforts
1
First attempts
2
Contexts for the opening Allegro
6
Symphony by J B?
9
In limbo
11
Completion first performances and publication
16
Renewal of work and completion of the whole
17
Prepublication performances
19
Third movement
58
Structure and meaning in the last movement
63
Early reception
79
Some early reactions
80
The Tenth Symphony
84
Wagners Brahms
87
Appendix
91
Notes
94

Later revisions and publication
28
Structure and meaning in the first movement
31
The middle movements
51

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