Brahms' Symphonies: A Closer Look

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Bloomsbury Academic, Mar 1, 2009 - Music - 144 pages
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Brahms was a musician's musician, in some respects an "academic" composer, and so it's practically impossible for professional scholars and musicians to approach his music without wanting to demonstrate at some point that they are as smart as Brahms, and uniquely able to unravel the technical intricacies of his larger works. For the general reader, this obviously represents a problem; indeed, it's not exactly a joy for the music professional either. Though Brahms' symphonies are often treated somewhat like medicine, as something "good for you," but otherwise lacking in purely sensual pleasure, David Hurwitz takes the reader beyond the jargon and pedantry and unlocks the mystery (and the joy) contained within Brahms' symphonies.

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Contents

BRAHMS HISTORICAL
1
BRAHMS VERSUS THE ORCHESTRA
23
SYMPHONY NO 1 IN C MINOR OP 68 1876
35
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

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About the author (2009)

David Hurwitz has been writing about classical music for more than twenty years. As a critic and commentator, his articles and essays have appeared in such well-known publications as High Fidelity, Opus, Classical Pulse!, In Tune, the New York Observer, Musical America, Stereo Review, CD Review, and numerous other magazines and newspapers, both in the U.S. and abroad. Founder and executive editor of www.ClassicsToday.com, the Internet's first classical music-daily review magazine, Hurwitz is also the author of eight books on subjects ranging from Haydn and Mozart to Mahler (The Mahler Symphonies: An Owner's Manual), Dvorak, Sibelius, and Shostakovich. He lives in New York.

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