Brain Mechanisms of Perception and Memory: From Neuron to Behavior

Front Cover
Taketoshi Ono
Oxford University Press, 1993 - Political Science - 692 pages
Information about perception and memory is accumulating rapidly in both basic and clinical neuroscience, and this progress has been made using a variety of approaches while drawing jointly on the traditions of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuropsychology. In order to disseminate research occurring in leading laboratories around the world, an international symposium on "Brain Mechanisms of Perception and Memory: From Neuron to Behavior" was held in Toyama, Japan, in October 1991. Planned in conjunction with this important meeting, this volume presents the work of over 40 eminent scientists from around the world. Their research covers many topics, including such core issues as the perception of form, perception of motion, memory and the limbic system, the neocortex, and neural plasticity. A prominent area of discussion at the symposium, and one which figures prominently in this volume, is work with nonhuman primates, especially useful in the study of perception and memory. The breadth of coverage of this volume in conjunction with its extensive studies of nonhuman primates makes this book a necessary reference for those interested in current perspectives on brain mechanisms of perception and memory. Neuroscientists, neuropsychologists, cognitive and physiological psychologists will find this authoritative, state-of-the-art review important and informative reading.

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Contents

Differential Functions of Central and Peripheral
3
Impaired Pattern Vision in Monkeys with Removal
16
Serial Processing of Visual ObjectFeatures in
34
Copyright

33 other sections not shown

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About the author (1993)

Masaji Fukuda, both with the Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Japan. Larry R. Squire, Professor of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego.

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