Brave New World

Front Cover
Random House, Dec 26, 2008 - Fiction - 288 pages
2964 Reviews

'The best science fiction book ever, definitely the most prescient... Looking at our present trajectory we are on the way to Brave New World' Yuval Noah Harari, author of Sapiens and Homo Deus

‘A masterpiece of speculation... As vibrant, fresh, and somehow shocking as it was when I first read it’ Margaret Atwood

A grave warning... Provoking, stimulating, shocking and dazzling' Observer

'What Aldous Huxley presented as fiction with the human hatcheries of Brave New World has become fact. The consequences are profound and, if we don't get it right, deeply disturbing' John Humphries, Sunday Times

WITH INTRODUCTIONS BY MARGARET ATWOOD AND DAVID BRADSHAW

Far in the future, the World Controllers have created the ideal society. Through clever use of genetic engineering, brainwashing and recreational sex and drugs all its members are happy consumers. Bernard Marx seems alone harbouring an ill-defined longing to break free. A visit to one of the few remaining Savage Reservations where the old, imperfect life still continues, may be the cure for his distress...

Huxley's ingenious fantasy of the future sheds a blazing light on the present and is considered to be his most enduring masterpiece.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
859
4 stars
1086
3 stars
660
2 stars
269
1 star
90

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MikeFutcher - LibraryThing

"He began to talk a lot of incomprehensible and dangerous nonsense." (pg. 83) Brave New World is a prescient but uneven depiction of a dystopia, one that is unnervingly similar to the world we live in ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - TysonAdams - LibraryThing

Giving up on this classic. Several chapters in and no main characters, no real plot, just a heap of exposition. At least 1984 had a clear protagonist and plot to follow. If I'm going to be bashed over the head with world building and social criticism I want it to be engaging. Read full review

All 5 reviews »

Other editions - View all

About the author (2008)

Aldous Huxley was born on 26 July 1894 near Godalming, Surrey. He began writing poetry and short stories in his early 20s, but it was his first novel, Crome Yellow (1921), which established his literary reputation. This was swiftly followed by Antic Hay (1923), Those Barren Leaves (1925) and Point Counter Point (1928) – bright, brilliant satires in which Huxley wittily but ruthlessly passed judgement on the shortcomings of contemporary society. For most of the 1920s Huxley lived in Italy and an account of his experiences there can be found in Along the Road (1925). The great novels of ideas, including his most famous work Brave New World (published in 1932 this warned against the dehumanising aspects of scientific and material 'progress') and the pacifist novel Eyeless in Gaza (1936) were accompanied by a series of wise and brilliant essays, collected in volume form under titles such as Music at Night (1931) and Ends and Means (1937). In 1937, at the height of his fame, Huxley left Europe to live in California, working for a time as a screenwriter in Hollywood. As the West braced itself for war, Huxley came increasingly to believe that the key to solving the world's problems lay in changing the individual through mystical enlightenment. The exploration of the inner life through mysticism and hallucinogenic drugs was to dominate his work for the rest of his life. His beliefs found expression in both fiction (Time Must Have a Stop,1944, and Island, 1962) and non-fiction (The Perennial Philosophy, 1945; Grey Eminence, 1941; and the account of his first mescalin experience, The Doors of Perception, 1954. Huxley died in California on 22 November 1963.

Bibliographic information