Brazilian Popular Music and Globalization

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Charles A. Perrone, Christopher Dunn
Routledge, Jan 11, 2013 - Music - 272 pages
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This collection of articles by leading scholars traces the history of Brazilian pop music through the twentieth-century.
 

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Contents

Internationalization in Brazilian Popular Music
1
2 Carmen Mirandadada
39
Black Orpheus Orfeu and Internationalization in Brazilian Popular Music
46
4 Tropicália Counterculture and the Diasporic Imagination in Brazil
72
Globalization as Seen through a Brazilian Pop Prism
96
The Tropicalist Revival
106
7 Defeated Rallies Mournful Anthems and the Origins of Brazilian Heavy Metal
123
8 The Localization of Global Funk in Bahia and in Rio
136
Reggae Black Counterculture and Globalization in Brazil
192
A Case of LongDistance Belonging
207
Music and Subjectivity in a Global Context
220
Maracatu de Baque Virado and Chico Science
233
Mestre Ambrosio
245
16 Good Blood in the Veins of This Brazilian Rio or a Cannibalist Transnationalism
258
Contributors
271
Copyrights and Acknowledgments
273

Geographic Space and Representation of Identity in the Carnival of Salvador Bahia
161
Ethnicity Activism and Art in a Globalized Carnival Community
177

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About the author (2013)

Charles A. Perrone (PhD Texas 1985) is Professor of Portuguese and Luso-Brazilian Literature and Culture at the University of Florida. He is the author of Masters of Contemporary Brazilian Song: MPB 1965-1985 (Texas, 1989), Seven Faces: Brazilian Poetry since Modernism (Duke, 1996) and translators/editor of several books. He lives in Jacksonville, FL.Christopher Dunn (Ph D Brown 1996) is Assistant Professor at Tulane University, where he holds a joint appointment in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and in the African and African Diaspora Studies Program. He is the author of a forthcoming book on the Tropicalist movement in Brazil and a contributor to Encarta on Afro-Brazilian topics including new popular music. He lives in New Orleans, LA.

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