Breaking the Failed-State Cycle

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Rand Corporation, May 7, 2008 - Political Science - 56 pages
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Insecurity in the 21st century appears to come less from the collisions of powerful states than from the debris of imploding ones. This paper aims to improve the understanding and treatment of failed states by focusing on critical challenges at the intersections between security, economics, and politics and on the guiding goal of lifting local populations from the status of victims of failure to agents of recovery.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER ONE Introduction
1
CHAPTER TWO Reframing the FailedState Challenge
5
CHAPTER THREE Identifying and Meeting Critical Challenges
9
CHAPTER FOUR Creating Conditions for Empowering the Population
23
Institutions and Leadership
31
APPENDIX Countries in Alert Zone
33
References
35
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About the author (2008)

Gregory F. Treverton is director of the RAND Corporation's Center for Global Risk and Security. Earlier, he directed RAND's Intelligence Policy Center and its International Security and Defense Policy Center and was associate dean of the Pardee RAND Graduate School. His recent work has focused on terrorism, intelligence and law enforcement, with a special interest in new forms of public-private partnership. Dr Treverton has served in government for the first Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, handling Europe for the National Security Council (NSC); most recently, he served as vice chair of the National Intelligence Estimates (NIEs). He holds a B.A. summa cum laude from Princeton University and a master's degree in public policy and a Ph.D. in economics and politics, both from Harvard University. His books include Reshaping National Intelligence for an Age of Information (Cambridge University Press, 2001), New Challenges, New Tools for Defense Decisionmaking (2003) and National Intelligence Systems: Current Research and Future Prospects (Cambridge University Press, 2009, coedited with Wilhelm Agrell).

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