Breaking the Ice: The Black Experience in Professional Hockey

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Insomniac Press, 2003 - Sports & Recreation - 224 pages
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Black hockey players from Grant Fuhr to Jarome Iginla speak candidly for the first time about their experiences in the NHL. Since 1958, thirty-seven black men have played in the National Hockey League. Out of the 600 players active today, fourteen are black. This is the first book to tell the unique stories of black hockey players -- how they overcame or succumbed to racial and cultural prejudices to play Canada's favourite pastime. Sports journalist Cecil Harris outlines in detail the personal and professional battles as well as the victories of such hockey pioneers as Herb Carnegie and Willie O'Ree -- men whose determination, skill and sheer love of the game smoothed the ice for black players to follow. Harris talks to well-known players like Grant Fuhr, the first black goaltender to be inducted in the Hockey Hall of Fame (2003), and 2001-02 MVP and Olympic gold medallist Jarome Iginla. With stick-handling precision, "Breaking the Ice" documents the struggles and contributions of black players to hockey, and leaves an indelible mark on hockey history. Includes exclusive interviews with hockey legends such as: Jarome Iginla, Herb Carnegie, Mike Marson, Willie O'Ree, Tony McKegney, Kevin Weekes, Grant Fuhr, Anson Carter and Donald Brashear.

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Contents

Foreword by Anson Carter
9
A Pioneer in Search of Fame
35
Wrong Place Wrong Time
59
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Cecil Harris is a veteran sports reporter who has covered the NHL for The Hockey News and The Sporting News. He covered the New York Rangers and New York Islanders for New York Newsday, and the Carolina Hurricanes for the Raleigh News and Observer. Breaking the Ice is his first book. Harris lives in Yonkers, NY, USA.

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