Breaking the Ice: From Land Claims to Tribal Sovereignty in the Arctic

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Lexington Books, 2008 - Political Science - 419 pages
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Contrary to popular claims, religion played a critical role in Barack Obama's 2008 election as president of the United States. Religion, race, and gender entered the national and electoral dialogue in an unprecedented manner. What stood out most in the 2008 presidential campaign was not that Republicans reached out to religious voters but that Democrats did--and with a vengeance. This tightly edited volume demonstrates how Obama charted a new course for Democrats by staking out claims among moderate-conservative faith communities and emerged victorious in the presidential contest, in part, by promoting a new Democratic racial-ethnic and religious pluralism.

Comprising careful analysis by leading experts on religion and politics in the United States, Gastn Espinosa's book details how ten of the largest segments of the American electorate voted and why, drawing on the latest and best available data, interviews, and sources. The voting patterns of Mainline Protestants, Evangelicals, Catholics, Jews, Muslims, and seculars are dissected in detail, along with the intersection of religion and women, African Americans, Latinos, and Asian Americans. The story of Obama's historic election is an insightful prism through which to explore the growing influence of religion in American politics.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Alaska in the Age of Native Land Claims
27
After ANCSA The Persistence of Subsistence
67
Land Claims Come to the Northwest Territories
135
CoManagement in Action Balancing the Two Arctics
193
After Land Claims Toward the Restoration of Tribal Sovereignty
289
Notes
331
Bibliography
387
Index
409
About the Author
421
Copyright

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Page 4 - The Eskimos of Canada are in a primitive state of social development. It is important that these people be not subjected unduly to disruption of their hunting economy, exposure to diseases against which their immunity is often low, or other effects of the presence of white men which might be injurious to them.

About the author (2008)

Barry Zellen is deputy editor, Strategic Insights, and research director of the Arctic security project at the Center for Contemporary Conflict.

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