Breton-English/English-Breton: dictionary and phrasebook

Front Cover
Hippocrene Books, 1997 - Foreign Language Study - 175 pages
Breton is the language of western Brittany in northern France. It is a Celtic language related to Cornish, Welsh and more distantly to Irish. This phrasebook is one of the few works about Breton in English. Written carefully and accurately, it includes a review of Breton grammar, phrases and tips for everyday interactions, and details about where to find Breton on the Internet.
This book is an easy and helpful introduction to an ancient tongue which has carried forth the tales of Arthur and other wonderful legends. To all those with an interest in Celtic languages, or language in general, the Breton Phrasebook is a book of great intelligence and provides innumerable insights into the Breton culture and language.
 

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This is a very bad handbook, full of mistakes.
P 77: "N'eo ket dic'hoarzh" for "That doesn't matter": "dic'hoarzh" means "without laughing", translated into French by "grave". JF Conroy tried to
translate litteraly "Ce n'est pas grave" (i.e. "It doesn't matter") by using this ill-chosen acception of "grave" ( "dic'hoarzh", "without laughing"). A matter for a good laugh, actually!
P 81: "Pelec'h c'hwi 'zo ganet?": even the worst learner would never make such a mistake.
P. 85: "An hini benaos eo?" : you have to read the English translation to find out what it can possibly mean.
And so on...
J Conroy obviously never spoke Breton to anyone, or people would have laughed at him.
F Louis
 

Contents

Foreword
7
BRETONENGLISH DICTIONARY
31
ENGLISHBRETON DICTIONARY
53
BRETON PHRASEBOOK
73
Breton on the Web
171
Copyright

References to this book

Celtic Culture: A-Celti

Limited preview - 2006

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