Bridge to Terabithia

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HarperTrophy, 1987 - Juvenile Fiction - 128 pages
4 Reviews
A secret world of their own

Jess Aaron's greatest ambition is to be the fastest runner in the fifth grade. He's been practicing all summer and can't wait to see his classmates' faces when he beats them all. But on the first day of school, a new kid, a new "girl," boldly crosses over to the boy's side of the playground and outruns everyone.

That's not a very promising beginning for a friendship, but Jess and Leslie Burke become inseparable. It doesn't matter to Jess that leslie dresses funny, or that her family has a lot of money -- but no TV. Leslie has imagination. Together, she and Jess create Terabithia, a magical kingdom in the woods where the two of them reign as king and queen, and their imaginations set the only limits. Then one morning a terrible tragedy occurs. Only when Jess is able to come to grips with this tragedy does he finally understand the strength and courage Leslie has given him.

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User Review  - pennsylady - LibraryThing

I chose the audio Bridge To Teribithia...and... I was quite surprised to find the depth of this tale in theme and symbol. I had no preknowledge of the tale other than: it was a banned book and subject ... Read full review

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User Review  - BookConcierge - LibraryThing

Audio book read by Tom Stechschulte Over the years, I’ve heard so much about this book of friendship and loss that I decided to finally read it. The book is about a boy and girl who become friends ... Read full review

Contents

One Jesse Oliver Aarons Jr
2
Three The Fastest Kid in the Fifth Grade
20
Five The Giant Killers
48
Copyright

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About the author (1987)

Katherine Paterson was born in Qing Jiang, Jiangsu, China in 1932. She attended King College in Bristol, Tennessee and then graduate school in Virginia where she studied Bible and Christian education. Before going to graduate school, she was a teacher for one year and after graduate school, she moved to Japan to be a missionary. Her first book, Sign of the Chrysanthemum was published in 1991. Other titles to follow included The Bridge to Terabithia and Jacod Have I Loved which both won her a Newbery Award, The Great Gilly Hopkins, Lyddie and The Master Puppeteer. In addition to the Newbery Award, she is the recipient of numerous others including the Scott O'Dell Award, the National Book Award for Children's Literature, the American Book Award, the American Library Association's Best Books for Young Adults Award and the New York Times Outstanding Books of the Year Award. She was also honored with the Hans Christian Anderson Award.

Donna Diamond has illustrated numerous children's books, including The Day of the Unicorn by Mollie Hunter and Riches by Esther Hautzig, as well as many book jackets. She lives in Riverdale, NY.

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