Bridging the Generation Gap: How to Get Radio Babies, Boomers, Gen Xers, and Gen Yers to Work Together and Achieve More

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Career Press, 2007 - Business & Economics - 222 pages
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If you are a manager, human resources professional or business owner, you are faced with these types of issues every day. But why? Because currently, there are five generations in the workplace: Radio Babies (born during 1930-1945); Baby Boomers (1946-1964); Generation X (1965-1976); Generation Y (1977-1991); even some Millennials (1991 and later). Each of them has a different perspective, based on their upbringing and daily lives. The key to making encounters between the generations successful is learning to understand the point of view of each generation and respect their differences. The individuals and organizations that do this will be the ones to succeed. This book will show you how. Authors Gravett and Throckmorton take a dynamic approach to the situation by writing in two distinct voices — as a Baby Boomer and a Gen Xer — using a "point-counterpoint" approach to identify differences and similarities across generations. They share hands-on experiences, real-life cases, recommended solutions and ground-breaking research on how members of any generation can better relate to minimize conflict, miscommunication and wasted energy. You will learn what each generation thinks of the others and how each wishes the others viewed it. Bridging the Generation Gap is filled with strategies and solutions you can implement immediately to help build your own bridge between the generations.
 

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User Review  - sandrafelker - LibraryThing

Interesting to compare and contrast the differences between the generations - especially how small changes in society can have such a huge impact on the work ethic and attitude of a generation. I ... Read full review

Contents

Why Cant We All Just Get Along?
11
Managing Gen Ys
16
Lets Talk Dollars and Sense
19
The Cost of Miscommunication Across Generations
25
The Generations in Context How Did We Get This Way?
31
Career Goals
47
How to Entice Each Generation to Join Your Organization
49
Recruiting
67
Older Workers Younger Bosses
125
Younger Managing Workers
136
They Want What? Working With the Gen Y Entitlement Mindset
139
Entitlement Mentality
147
Tailoring Training and Development Across Generations
151
Training for the Generations
163
Building a Bridge Across the Generations
167
Creating a Cohesive Team
174

Retaining Quality Radio Babies
69
Hiring Older Workers
75
Retaining Quality Baby Boomers
77
Retaining Baby Boomers
83
Retaining Quality Gen Xers
87
Promoting Younger Workers
95
Retaining Quality Gen Ys
97
Gen Y Work Ethic
104
Get Ready Cause Here I Come
107
Retaining Millennials
113
Managing Conflict Across Generations
115
Managing Conflict
123
Generational Imposters A Presentation
177
Interviewing Younger Generations
183
Frequently Asked Questions
189
Managing Conflict With Younger Generations
195
Research Results
199
Worksheet Calculating Turnover Costs
207
Generation BirthYears
211
Reference List
213
Index
217
About the Authors
221
Copyright

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Page 214 - Howe, Neil and William Strauss. 2000. Millennials Rising. New York: Vintage Books.

About the author (2007)

Linda S. Gravett, Ph.D., SPHR is faculty member at Xavier University as part of The Senior Management Certificate Program. Linda has been a consultant and educator in the Human Resources field for 11 years and was a Human Resource Practitioner for 14 years before that. She has consulted for service, manufacturing, public sector, and nonprofit organizations. She is an active speaker and trainer on a variety of topics including Ethical Dilemmas in Human Resources, Measuring the Outcomes of a Diversity Initiative, and Aligning the Diversity Initiative with the Organization s Strategic Plan. Linda is Myers Briggs Type Indicator certified and has used the certification to counsel individuals and groups in career management and teambuilding. She is also a founding partner of two consulting firms: Gravett and Associates and e-HResources.com. Linda has been involved with the Society for Human Resource Management for 17 years in various leadership capacities, including State Director of Ohio, Area III Diversity Director, and Chair of the National School-to-Work Committee. For two years she served on the Eastern Writing Panel for the Human Resources Certification Institute. Linda is the 1999 recipient of the Society for Human Resource Management s David Award for Professional Excellence and the 1991 recipient of the National Professional Business Woman s Individual Progress Award. She has been honored with inclusion in Who s Who in the Midwest, Who s Who of Executive Women, and Who s Who of American Women.

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