Brief Course in Algebra

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C.W. Bardeen, 1915 - Algebra - 198 pages
 

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Page 80 - In the multiplication of whole numbers, place the multiplier under the multiplicand, and multiply each term of the multiplicand by each term of the multiplier, writing the right-hand figure of each product obtained under the term of the multiplier which produces it.
Page 124 - Multiply the numerators together for a new numerator, and the denominators together for a new denominator.
Page 87 - Divide the first term of the dividend by the first term of the divisor, and write the result as the first term of the quotient. Multiply the whole divisor by the first term of the quotient, and subtract the product from the dividend.
Page 26 - To divide a polynomial by a monomial, divide each term of the polynomial by the monomial: (Sab — 12ac) -i- 4a = 36 — 3c.
Page 113 - Therefore, the principles of division apply to the terms of a fraction, and both terms of a fraction may be multiplied or divided by the same number, without changing the value of the fraction.
Page 78 - To multiply a polynomial by a monomial, multiply each term of the polynomial by the monomial and add the partial products: (6a — 3ft) x 3c = 18uc -96c.
Page 35 - Both members of an equation may be multiplied or divided by the same number without changing the value of the unknown number.
Page 26 - Division, in Algebra, is the process of finding one of two factors, when their product and the other factor are given.
Page 150 - Therefore the coefficient of the third term is found by multiplying the coefficient of the second term by the exponent of a in that term, and dividing the product by the number which marks the place of that term from the left.
Page 116 - ... denominator by 3x. Rule : To reduce a fraction to its lowest terms, Factor the numerator and denominator into prime factors, and cancel the factors common to both. Cancellation as used in the rule really means that we actually divide both terms of the fraction by the common factors. Then, to reduce a fraction to its lowest terms, it is only necessary to divide both numerator and denominator by the highest common factor, which leaves an equivalent fraction.

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