Brierly's Law of Nations: An Introduction to the Role of International Law in International Relations

Front Cover
OUP Oxford, Aug 9, 2012 - Law - 518 pages
0 Reviews
This concise book is an introduction to the role of international law in international relations. Written for lawyers and non-lawyers alike, the book first appeared in 1928 and attracted a wide readership. This new edition builds on Brierly's scholarship and his idea that law must serve a social purpose. Previous editions of The Law of Nations have been the standard introduction to international law for decades, and are widely popular in many different countries due to the simplicity and brevity of the prose style. Providing a comprehensive overview of international law, this new version of the classic book retains the original qualities and is again essential reading for all those interested in learning what role the law plays in international affairs. The reader will find chapters on traditional and contemporary topics such as: the basis of international obligation, the role of the UN and the International Criminal Court, the emergence of new states, the acquisition of territory, the principles covering national jurisdiction and immunities, the law of treaties, the different ways of settling international disputes, and the rules on resort to force and the prohibition of aggression.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Acknowledgements
xxv
Abbreviations
xxix
Table of Cases
xxxiii
Table of Treaties Other International Instruments and National Legislation
xli
I The Origins of International Law
1
II The Basis of Obligation in International Law
41
III The Legal Organization of International Society
101
IV States
139
V The Territory of States
168
VI Jurisdiction
206
VII Treaties
302
VIII International Disputes and the Maintenance of International Peace and Security
392
IX Resort to Force
450
INDEX
505
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)


Andrew Clapham is Professor of Public International Law at the Graduate Institute of International Studies, Geneva. Before he joined the Graduate Institute of International Studies Institute in 1997, he was the Representative of Amnesty International to the United Nations in New York. His current research relates to the role of non-state actors in international law and related questions in human rights and humanitarian law. Andrew Clapham is the Director of the Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights. His publications include Human Rights: A Very Short Introduction (2007), Human Rights Obligations of Non-State Actors (2006), and International Human Rights Lexicon (2005), with Susan Marks.

Bibliographic information