Brighton Rock

Front Cover
Vintage books, Aug 1, 2010 - Brighton (England) - 269 pages
37 Reviews
This title is presented with an introduction by J.M. Coetzee. A gang war is raging through the dark underworld of Brighton. Seventeen-year-old Pinkie, malign and ruthless, has killed a man. Believing he can escape retribution, he is unprepared for the courageous, life-embracing Ida Arnold. Greene's gripping thriller, exposes a world of loneliness and fear, of life lived on the 'dangerous edge of things'. 'In a class by himself-the ultimate chronicler of twentieth-century man's consciousness and anxiety' - William Golding, "Independent".

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Sean191 - LibraryThing

This was the fourth or fifth book I've read by Greene. It's been a couple years since the last one, but I still really enjoy him. This book had giant characters, but they didn't seem ridiculous in ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gwhittick - LibraryThing

Without doubt the most miserable, sordid, depressing book I have ever read. I read it at school about 40 years ago and have never even opened anything by Graham Greene since. Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Born in 1904, Graham Greene was the son of a headmaster and the fourth of six children. Preferring to stay home and read rather than endure the teasing at school that was a by-product of his father's occupation, Greene attempted suicide several times and eventually dropped out of school at the age of 15. His parents sent him to an analyst in London who recommended he try writing as therapy. He completed his first novel by the time he graduated from college in 1925. Greene wrote both entertainments and serious novels. Catholicism was a recurring theme in his work, notable examples being The Power and the Glory (1940) and The End of the Affair (1951). Popular suspense novels include: The Heart of the Matter, Our Man in Havana and The Quiet American. Greene was also a world traveler and he used his experiences as the basis for many books. One popular example, Journey Without Maps (1936), was based on a trip through the jungles of Liberia. Greene also wrote and adapted screenplays, including that of the 1949 film, The Third Man, which starred Orson Welles. He died in Vevey, Switzerland in 1991.

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