Brilliants: Selected from the Writings of Wm. E. Gladstone

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H.M. Caldwell, 1894 - 48 pages
 

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Page 42 - Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze, Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees ; Lives through all life, extends through all extent, Spreads undivided, operates unspent...
Page 34 - Keject, therefore, the false philosophy of those who will ask what does it matter, provided a thing be useful, whether it be beautiful or not : and say in reply that we will take one lesson from Almighty God, "Who in His works hath shown us, and in His Word also has told us, that
Page 33 - It is, indeed, true that peace has its moral perils and temptations for degenerate man, as has every other blessing, without exception, that he can receive from the hand of God. It is moreover not less true that, amidst the clash of arms, the noblest forms of character may be reared, and the highest acts of duty done...
Page 26 - ... want of any one of them will commonly prevent the attainment of perfection in any other. The sense of beauty enters into the highest philosophy, as in Plato. The highest poet must be a philosopher, accomplished, like Dante, or intuitive, like Shakspeare.
Page 18 - ... or can be, as to make the absolute distance between the greatest of human greatness, and the smallest of human littleness, sink into insignificance. No more in the inner than in the outer sphere did Christ come among us as a conqueror, making His appeal to force. We were neither to be consumed by the heat of the Divine presence, nor were we to be dazzled by its brightness. God was not in the storm, nor in the fire, nor in the flood, but He was in the still small voice. This vast treasure was...
Page 12 - If I will that he tarry till I come, what is that to thee ? Follow thou Me...
Page 29 - If it subsist for a few generations (and generations are for books what years are for their writers), it is not likely to sink in many. For works of the mind really great there is no old age, no decrepitude. It is inconceivable that a time should come when Homer, Dante, Shakespeare, shall not ring in the ears of civilised man.
Page 21 - In beseeching, especially, the young to study the application to their daily life of that principle of order which both engenders diligence and strength of will, and likewise so greatly multiplies their power, I am well assured that they will find this to be not only an intellectual but a moral exercise. Every real and searching effort at selfimprovement is of itself a lesson of profound humility. For we cannot move a step without learning and feeling the waywardness, the weakness, the vacillation...
Page 43 - Now, if we survey with care and candour the present wealth of the world — I mean its wealth intellectual, moral, and spiritual — we find that Christianity has not only contributed to the patrimony of man its brightest and most precious jewels, but has likewise been what our Saviour pronounced it, the salt or preserving principle of all the residue, and has maintained its health, so far as it has been maintained at all, against corrupting agencies. But, the salt is one thing, the thing salted...
Page 35 - ... among her most distinguished ornaments, was asked by Mr. Boswell, how he had attained to his extraordinary excellence in conversation, he replied, he had no other rule or system than this; that, whenever he had anything to say, he tried to say it in the best manner he was able. It is this perpetual striving after excellence on the one hand, or the want of such effort on the other, which, more than the original difference of gifts (certain and great as that difference may be), contributes to bring...

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