Bringing innovation to market: how to break corporate and customer barriers

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Wiley, Oct 2, 1987 - Business & Economics - 247 pages
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An incisive primer on how to make sure new technology-based products succeed. Explains the role of discontinuity and ways to deal with it when adopting a marketing strategy. It helps marketers plan for and manage discontinuity and identify their optimum marketing strategy. With a 10-Point Product Test Screen for assessing a product's chances in the marketplace, plus scores of actual examples, this is a book that can help every innovator reach a marketing breakthrough.

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Contents

ENCOUNTERING THE BARRIERS
1
Corporate Barriers to Innovation
29
Customer Barriers to Innovation
63
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (1987)

Jagdish N. Sheth is the Charles H. Kellstadt Professor of Marketing in the Goizueta Business School and the founder of the Center for Relationship Marketing (CRM) at Emory University. Prior to his present position, he was the Robert E. Brooker Professor of Marketing at the University of Southern California and the founder of the Center for Telecommunications Management; the Walter H. Stellner Distinguished Professor of Marketing at the University of Illinois, and on the faculty of Columbia University, as well as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Dr. Sheth is nationally and internationally known for his scholarly contributions in Consumer Behavior, Marketing, Global Competition, and Strategic Thinking.
Jag has published more than 200 books and research papers in different areas of marketing. His book The Theory of Buyer Behavior (1969) with John A. Howard is a classic in the field. He is also a co-author of Marketing Theory: Evolution and Evaluation (1988), Consumption Values and Market Choices (1991), Clients for Life (2000), ValueSpace: Winning the Battle for Market Leadership (2001), and The Rule of Three (2002).

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