Britain and the Origins of Canadian Confederation, 1837-67

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UBC Press, 1995 - History - 388 pages
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In Britain and the Origins of Canadian Confederation,1837-1867, Ged Martin offers a sceptical review of claims thatConfederation answered all the problems facing the provinces, andexamines in detail British perceptions of Canada and ideas about itsfuture. The major British contribution to the coming of Confederationis to be found not in the aftermath of the Quebec conference, where theimperial role was mainly one of bluff and exhortation, but prior to1864, in a vague consensus among opinion-formers that the provinceswould one day unite. Faced with an inescapable need to securelegislation at Westminster for a new political structure, British NorthAmerican politicians found they could work within the context of ametropolitan preference for intercolonial union.
 

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Contents

Canadian Confederation and Historical
27
The Origins of British Support
81
The British and their Perceptions
117
Motives and Expectations of The British
157
The Role of the British
203
The Role of the British
237
Conclusion
291
Index
375
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About the author (1995)

Ged Martin has been Director of the Centre of CanadianStudies at the University of Edinburgh since 1983. He was previouslyStatutory Lecturer at the National University of Ireland, Lecturer inModern History at University College Cork, and Research Fellow inHistory at the Australian National University, Canberra.

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