British Pro-consuls in Egypt, 1914-1929: The Challenge of Nationalism

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Psychology Press, 2005 - Biography & Autobiography - 273 pages
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With World War I and Egypt's colourful politics as background, C.W.R. Long tells the story of four proconsuls (McMahon, Wingate, Allenby and Lloyd), their principal opponent, Sa'ad Zaghul, and the great events of the time: the rise of the Wafd party, the uprising of 1919, the murder of Sir Lee Stack and the Allenby ultimatum. He sheds new light on the strife of members of the High Commission among themselves and the Foreign Office, on the struggle between Egypt and Britain for ownership of the Sudan, on Egypt's fight for independence and on the failure of democracy to take root in the country.
 

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Contents

PARTI
5
PART II
31
PART IV
137
diplomatic
152
Lindsay comes full
161
funding
204
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

C.W.R. Long is a full-time writer on Arab world topics. After Lancaster Royal Grammar School and National Service, he studied Arabic and Persian at St. Catherine's College, Cambridge, and Turkish at McGill University, Montreal. In the 1990s he directed Islamic Studies at Newcastle University, taught at Durham University and travelled regularly to the Middle East.

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