British Sculpture and the Company Raj: Church Monuments and Public Statuary in Madras, Calcutta, and Bombay to 1858

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University of Delaware Press, 1995 - Art - 152 pages
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"The British Raj (a Sanskrit-based word meaning dominion or empire), which has taken on a wholly Victorian flavor as a result of popular films and books, actually began in piecemeal fashion when the East India Company developed settlements in Madras, Calcutta, and Bombay during the seventeenth century. As these small enclaves grew into cities, the British tried hard to give them the look and feel of the country they had left behind." "Barbara Groseclose examines British public statuary and church monuments in India from the standpoint of its function in regard to the British themselves. Arguing that doubts and anxieties, as well as assumptions about their own place in Indian life, bear strongly on the roles and achievements for which the British sought or received commemoration, she analyzes the British self-characterizations of victor, administrator, scholar, and benefactor in sculptural imagery. Her close scrutiny of these largely forgotten works of art reveals the crucial part they played in helping the British to explain and justify empire to themselves. But the author's sense of the inherently ambivalent nature of the colonizer/colonized relationship prevents this book from becoming simply a platform for the indictment of imperialists or for an insistence on the wholesale victimization of their subjects. Rather, Groseclose discerns in this art some of the complicated emotional undertones simultaneously shaping and destabilizing the attempted economic and intellectual domination of India."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
 

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Contents

The Company and Company India
28
Britannia and the Riches of India
48
Service Merchants Missionaries and Mothers
77
Learning India
100
Conclusion
124
Notes
128
Bibliography
139
Index
145
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Page 26 - GREAT nations write their autobiographies in three manuscripts — the book of their deeds, the book of their words, and the book of their art. Not one of these books can be understood unless we read the two others ; but of the three, the only quite trustworthy one is the last.

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