British Women Writers 1914-1945: Professional Work and Friendship

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Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2006 - Literary Criticism - 184 pages
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Cathy Clay's persuasively argued and rigorously documented study examines women's friendships during the period between the two world wars. Building on extensive new archival research, the book's organizing principle is a series of literary-historical case studies that explore the practices, meanings and effects of friendship within a network of British women writers, who were all loosely connected to the feminist weekly periodical Time and Tide. Clay considers the letters and diaries, as well as fiction, poetry, autobiographies and journalistic writings, of authors such as Vera Brittain, Winifred Holtby, Storm Jameson, Naomi Mitchison, and Stella Benson, to examine women's friendships in relation to two key contexts: the rise of the professional woman writer under the shadow of literary modernism and historic shifts in the cultural recognition of lesbianism crystallized by The Well of Loneliness trial in 1928.
 

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Contents

Womens Friendship in InterWar Britain
9
a Trade in Work and Desire
37
A Romance of Business
51
A Passionate Beckoning
74
Representing the Lesbian Body
100
Writing about Poetry
143
Conclusion
158
Bibliography
171
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