British Edible Fungi: How to Distinguish and how to Cook Them : with Coloured Figures of Upwards to Forty Species

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Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Company Limited, 1891 - Basidiomycetes, Edible - 237 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
17
III
24
IV
31
V
37
VI
44
VII
49
VIII
57
XIX
126
XX
133
XXI
138
XXII
145
XXIII
151
XXIV
161
XXV
173
XXVI
176

IX
66
X
72
XI
77
XII
84
XIII
91
XIV
96
XV
102
XVI
107
XVII
114
XVIII
121
XXVII
183
XXVIII
189
XXIX
193
XXX
198
XXXI
201
XXXII
206
XXXIII
213
XXXIV
218
XXXV
225

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Page 15 - And so it seems to be throughout the country. Hill and plain, mountain and valley, woods, fields, and pastures, swarm with a profusion of good nutritious fungi, which are allowed to decay where they spring up, because people do not know how or are afraid to use them.
Page 53 - Remove the stalks and scales from the young half-grown agarics, and throw each one as you do so into a basin of fresh water slightly acidulated with the juice of a lemon or a little good vinegar. When all are prepared, remove them from the water and put them in a stewpan with a very small piece of fresh butter. Sprinkle with...
Page 83 - ... bruised, about the fourth of a saltspoonful of cayenne, tied in a small bit of muslin, and two large blades of mace ; to these may be added half a small nutmeg, sliced ; but too much spice will entirely overpower the fine natural flavour of the mushrooms. When the pickle boils, throw them in, and boil them in it over a clear fire moderately fast from six to nine minutes, or somewhat longer, should they not be very small. When they are much disproportioned in size, the larger ones should have...
Page 131 - I had a dozen for supper, the largest number I ever had at one time. " The Lycoperdon giganteum is also a great favourite with me, as it is, indeed, with all my acquaintances who have tried it. It has not the high aroma of some others, but it has a delicacy of flavour that makes it superior to any omelette I have ever eaten. It seems, furthermore, to be so digestible as to adapt it to the most delicate stomachs. This is the South Down of mushrooms.
Page 164 - ... alone, will disinter the fungus and carry it to his master. It is not usual, however, to allow the dog to exhaust himself in this way, and the owner forks up the truffle and gives the dog his usual reward, a piece of bread or cheese ; for this he looks, from long habit, with the keen glance of a Spanish gipsy. The truffle-hunter is set up in business when he possesses a good dog ; all he requires besides will be a short staff, about 2ft.
Page 113 - Though much neglected in this country it appears to be a most valuable article of food. It resembles much in taste the common mushroom and is quite as delicate ; it abounds in seasons when these are not to be found.
Page 130 - A gardener brought us a large Puff-ball, equal in size to a half-quartern loaf, and which was still in its young and pulpy state, of a beautiful creamy whiteness when cut. It had been found developing itself in a garden at Highgate, and to the finder its virtues were unknown. We had this specimen cut in slices of about half an inch in thickness, the outer skin peeled off, and each slice dipped in an egg, which had been previously beaten up, then sprinkled with bread-crumbs, and fried in butter, with...
Page 15 - ... mountain and valley, woods, fields, and pastures, swarm with a profusion of good, nutritious fungi, which are allowed to decay where they spring up, because people do not know how, or are afraid, to use them. By those of us who know their use their value was appreciated, as never before, during our late war, when other food, especially meat, was scarce and dear. Then such persons as I have heard express a preference for mushrooms over meat had generally no need to lack grateful food, as it was...
Page 27 - ... heat violently, and in consequence should be now and then turned for sweetening ; after this has subsided to moderation, it will be in a fit state for forming into a bed. In the process of making the bed, the dung should be put on in small quantities and beat firmly and equally together, until it is the required size ; in this state let it remain until the highest degree of heat to which it is capable of coming is ascertained, which may be readily done by inserting a heat-stick, and pressing...

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