Broken Patterns: Professional Women and the Quest for a New Feminine Identity

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Wayne State University Press, 1995 - Business & Economics - 220 pages
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In Broken Patterns, journalist Anita Harris reveals how a powerful mother-daughter dynamic has shaped the experience of professional women in America. Using a unique approach that integrates personal interviews and historical and psychological research, she examines the complex relationships women share with their mothers and grandmothers and considers how those relationships and society's changing attitudes affect women's roles. The book offers an important new perspective on the dilemmas of modern career women and on current feminist debate. Broken Patterns provides a new and useful framework through which professional women can think about their own lives. It challenges current notions of success and emphasizes the importance of respecting both the similarities and differences that exist among women.
 

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Contents

Acknowledgments
7
One Womans Story
23
16001900
35
19001950
60
The 1950s
81
The 1960s
97
The 1970s
112
The 1980s
136
Present Past and Future
156
Notes
171
Bibliography
201
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About the author (1995)

Anita Harris, president of Harris Media Associates, a communications consulting firm in the Boston area, has reported for the MacNeil Lehrer Report, Newsday, and public radio. She has taught at Yale University, Harvard University, and Simmons College.

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