Broken Windows, Broken Business: How the Smallest Remedies Reap the Biggest Rewards

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Grand Central Publishing, Oct 15, 2007 - Business & Economics - 192 pages
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Once every few years a book comes along with an insight so penetrating, so powerful - and so simply, demonstrably true -that it instantly changes the way we think and do business. Such a book is Broken Windows, Broken Business, a breakthrough in management theory that can alter the destiny of countless companies striving to stay ahead of their competition. "In this vital work, author Michael Levine offers compelling evidence that problems in business, large and small, typically stem from inattention to tiny details. Social psychologists and criminologists agree that if a window in a building is broken and left unrepaired, soon thereafter the rest of the windows will be broken - and the perception will build that crime in that neighborhood is out of control. The same principle applies to business." "Drawing on real-world corporate examples, from JetBlue's decision to give fliers what they really want - leather seats, personal televisions, online ticketing - to Google's customer-based strategy for breaking out of the pack of Internet search engines, to business-to-business firms' successes and failures, Levine proves again and again how constant vigilance and an obsession with detail can make or break a business or a brand." "With tips and advice on changing any business to one that dots its i's, crosses its t's, and attracts more clients, Broken Windows, Broken Business goes straight to the heart of what makes all enterprises successful - the little things that mean a lot."--BOOK JACKET.
 

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User Review  - Scarchin - LibraryThing

Here it is: First impressions matter. That's it. And although it was repetitive, the message sunk in and gave me pause to consider what messages I send every day - intentionally and unintentionally. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
Chapter One
Chapter Two
Roots of the Problem
Come Back Ray
Chapter Three
Compulsion
Chapter Four
How to Fix the Airlines
Chapter Ten
Target Stores
The Walt Disney Company
Apple Computer
Chapter Eleven
Chapter Twelve
Chapter Thirteen

Chapter Five
Above and Beyond
Chapter Six
Chapter Seven
Chapter Eight
Chapter Nine
Chapter Fourteen
Chapter Fifteen
Chapter Sixteen
Chapter Seventeen
The Broken Windows for Business Pledge
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Michael Levine spent a total of 25 years working undercover for four federal agencies. As an agent for the Drug Enforcement Administration for 23 years, Levine would ultimately bring about the arrests of approximately 3,000 criminals, by posing as priests, Colombian and Puerto Rican drug merchants, and a mob leader. In this manner, he was able to corral millions of drug money dollars. As a Jew growing up in a Hispanic neighborhood in South Bronx, New York City, Levine grew up pretending to be Puerto Rican and speaking fluent Spanish. Despite a couple of pre-adulthood arrests, he joined the U.S. Air Force. Later came marriage and the earning of an accounting degree at Hofstra University, an education financed through tending bar and playing saxophone. After graduation, he moved to the U.S. Treasury Department; this was followed by a stint in the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms. Michael Levine survived impersonating drug dealers but he also faced the drug wars at home. He tried to get his brother David to kick the heroin habit by having him move into his home with Levine, his wife, and his family, but David would later commit suicide. Levine's daughter faced drug trouble as well. She was removed from the family through a court petition, but she later rejoined them. Michael Levine has chronicled life as a federal agent in such books as Deep Cover. He enjoys walks with his wife Laura Kavanu and dog in Ulster County, N.Y.

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