Brokering Belonging: Chinese in Canada's Exclusion Era, 1885-1945

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Oxford University Press, Oct 11, 2010 - History - 240 pages
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Brokering Belonging traces several generations of Chinese "brokers," ethnic leaders who acted as intermediaries between the Chinese and Anglo worlds of Canada. Before World War II, most Chinese could not vote and many were illegal immigrants, so brokers played informal but necessary roles as representatives to the larger society. Lisa Rose Mar's study of Chinatown leaders shows how politics helped establish North America's first major group of illegal immigrants. Drawing on new Chinese language evidence, her dramatic account of political power struggles over representing Chinese Canadians offers a transnational immigrant view of history, centered in a Pacific World that joins Canada, the United States, China, and the British Empire.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Negotiating Protection Illegal Immigration and Party Machines
15
Arguing Cases Legal Interpreters Law and Society
49
Popularizing Politics The AntiSegregation Movement as Social Revolution
69
Fixing Knowledge Pacific Coast Chinese Leaders Management of the Chicago School of Sociology
89
Transforming Democracy Brokerage Politics and the Exclusion Eras Denouement
111
Conclusion
131
Notes
135
Bibliography
191
Index
217
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About the author (2010)

Lisa Rose Mar is an Associate Professor of History and Asian American Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park.

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