Brothers: A Novel

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Bantam Books, 1996 - Fiction - 434 pages
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"Some see it as the greatest scientific breakthrough in the history of medical research. Others as a blasphemous attempt to play God. At a corporate lab in Connecticut, researchers have pioneered an amazing genetic technique that can regenerate functioning organs inside the human body. The medical implications are staggering: Could humankind become immortal? Now, in a worldwide media spotlight, an unprecedented "science court" has been convened in Washington, D.C. Its mandate is to hear the evidence and decide whether or not the experiments should be allowed to continue." "On opposite sides of the courtroom stand two brothers. Dr. Arthur Marshak is the brilliant director of Grenford Laboratory who sees his work in organ regeneration as the crowning achievement of his career, a chance at the Nobel Prize, and a momentous gift to humanity. His younger brother, Dr. Jessie Marshak, is a physician, humanitarian, and idealist who sees the imperfect technique as unethical at best, elitist by implication, and dangerous at worst. And standing between them is Julia Marshak, a remarkable, beautiful woman who broke one brother's heart and married the other."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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BROTHERS

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

A biotechnical breakthrough throws two brothers into conflict in this high-tech thriller set in a "science court" in the nation's capital. Bova is best known for science fiction (Orion Among the Stars ... Read full review

Brothers: a novel

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

What if, instead of being transplanted, hearts, livers, and kidneys could simply be regrown like a lizard's tail? This turns out to be a faint possibility in Arthur Marshak's genetic lab. He ... Read full review

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About the author (1996)

Ben Bova, Ben Bova was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He began writing fiction in the late 1940's and continued to pursue his careers in journalism, aerospace, education and publishing. Bova received a bachelor's degree in journalism from Temple University, 1954, a master of arts degree in communications from the State University of New York, 1987, and a doctorate in education from California Coast University, 1996. Dr. Bova worked as a newspaper reporter for several years and then joined Project Vanguard, the first American satellite program, as a technical editor. He was manager of marketing for Avco Everett Research Laboratory and worked with scientists in the fields of high-power lasers, artificial hearts and advanced electrical power generators. Dr. Bova has taught science fiction at Harvard University and at the Hayden Planetarium in New York City, where he also directed film courses. He has written scripts for teaching films with the Physical Sciences Study Committee in association with Nobel Laureates from many universities. Dr. Bova has served on the advisory board of Post College and the Editorial Boards of the World Future Society. He is President Emeritus of the National Space Society and a Fellow of the British Interplanetary Society. He is also a charter member of the Planetary Society and a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Nature Conservancy, the New York Academy of Sciences and the National Space Club. He is a former President and a charter member of Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. He was honored by Temple University as a Distinguished Alumnus in 1981 and in 1982 was made an Alumni Fellow. In 1994, his short story "Inspiration" was nominated for the Nebula Award. "The Beauty of Light" was voted one of the best science books of the year in 1988 by the American Librarians' Association and they hailed "Moonrise" as best science fiction novel in 1996. Other titles include "Moonwar," "Mars," and "Brothers," which all combine romance and adventure with the scientific aspect of exploring the future of technology and its effect on individuals and society. "Immortality" and "Assured Survival" deal with technology being used to solve economic, social and political problems. "Immortality" goes further in examining biomedical breakthroughs that could extend a persons life by hundreds of years while being able to always remain physically young. His works include The Aftermath, Mars Life, and Leviathans of Jupiter.

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