Brute Force: Cracking the Data Encryption Standard

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Springer Science & Business Media, Oct 25, 2007 - Science - 292 pages
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In the 1960s, it became increasingly clear that more and more information was going to be stored on computers, not on pieces of paper. With these changes in technology and the ways it was used came a need to protect both the systems and the information. For the next ten years, encryption systems of varying strengths were developed, but none proved to be rigorous enough. In 1973, the NBS put out an open call for a new, stronger encryption system that would become the new federal standard. Several years later, IBM responded with a system called Lucifer that came to simply be known as DES (data encryption standard).

The strength of an encryption system is best measured by the attacks it is able to withstand, and because DES was the federal standard, many tried to test its limits. (It should also be noted that a number of cryptographers and computer scientists told the NSA that DES was not nearly strong enough and would be easily hacked.) Rogue hackers, usually out to steal as much information as possible, tried to break DES. A number of "white hat" hackers also tested the system and reported on their successes. Still others attacked DES because they believed it had outlived its effectiveness and was becoming increasingly vulnerable. The sum total of these efforts to use all of the possible keys to break DES over time made for a brute force attack.

In 1996, the supposedly uncrackable DES was broken. In this captivating and intriguing book, Matt Curtin charts DES’s rise and fall and chronicles the efforts of those who were determined to master it.

 

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Contents

III
1
IV
3
V
11
VI
23
VII
37
VIII
41
RSA Crypto Challenges
49
IX
57
XXI
163
XXII
165
XXIII
169
XXIV
175
XXV
189
XXVI
199
XXVII
207
XXVIII
213

X
63
XI
75
XII
77
Needle in a Haystack
85
XIII
91
XIV
97
XV
113
XVI
121
XVII
127
XVIII
135
Milestones
139
XIX
141
Network
151
XX
159
XXIX
215
XXX
229
Getting Word Out
235
XXXI
239
XXXII
241
XXXIII
249
XXXIV
255
XXXV
259
XXXVI
267
XXXVII
271
XXXVIII
275
XXXIX
283
XL
287
Copyright

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Page 3 - And, if by chance, any magnificent truth falls to its notice, it seizes upon if and abuses it to the manifold disadvantage of persons and of the community. A man is crazy who writes a secret unless he conceals it from the crowd and leaves it so that it can be understood only by effort of the studious and wise. Accordingly, the life of wise men is conducted after this principle, and secrets of wisdom are hidden by a variety of methods. Some are hidden under characters and symbols, others in enigmatical...

About the author (2007)

Curtain is responsible for the technical leadership of Interhack's research, development, and consulting efforts. Matt also teaches Programming in Common Lisp and Operating Systems Laboratory at The Ohio State University's Department of Computer and Information Science.

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