Buddhist Phenomenology: A Philosophical Investigation of Yogācāra Buddhism and the Chʼeng Wei-shih Lun

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2002 - History - 611 pages
0 Reviews
A richly complex study of the Yogacara tradition of Buddhism, divided into five parts: the first on Buddhism and phenomenology, the second on the four basic models of Indian Buddhist thought, the third on karma, meditation and epistemology, the fourth on the Trimsika and its translations, and finally the fifth on the Ch'eng Wei-shih Lun and Yogacara in China.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter One Buddhism and Phenomenology
1
Introduction
42
Pratityasamutpada
52
Tridhatu
83
SilaSamadhiPrajna
110
Chapter Seven Asarnjnisamapatti and Nirodhasamapatti
123
Chapter Eight Summary of the Four Models
160
Chapter Nine Karma
168
Parinama
426
Chapter Seventeen Why Consciousness in Not Empty
447
Chapter Eighteen On Rupa
472
Chapter Nineteen Externality
484
Chapter Twenty The Four Conditions
496
and VijnaptiRupa
518
Chapter Twenty Three Is What is Ultimately Real Itself
528
One Hundred Dharmas
542

Chapter Ten Madhyamikan Issues
200
Prajnaparamita
244
Part Four Trimsika and Translations
273
Part Five The Cheng WeiShih Lun and the Problem
351
Chapter Fifteen The Legend of the Transmission of
382
Comparison of One Hundred and Seventyfive Dharmas
549
Bibliography
574
Index
605
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information