Buffalo Dance: The Journey of York

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University Press of Kentucky, 2004 - History - 71 pages
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Among the most pervasive of stereotypes imposed upon southern highlanders is that they were white, opposed slavery, and supported the Union before and during the Civil War, but the historical record suggests far different realities. John C. Inscoe has spent much of his scholarly career exploring the social, economic and political significance of slavery and slaveholding in the mountain South and the complex nature of the region's wartime loyalties, and the brutal guerrilla warfare and home front traumas that stemmed from those divisions. The essays here embrace both facts and fictions related to those issues, often conveyed through intimate vignettes that focus on individuals, families, and communities, keeping the human dimension at the forefront of his insights and analysis. Drawing on the memories, memoirs, and other testimony of slaves and free blacks, slaveholders and abolitionists, guerrilla warriors, invading armies, and the highland civilians they encountered, Inscoe considers this multiplicity of perspectives and what is revealed about highlanders' dual and overlapping identities as both a part of, and distinct from, the South as a whole. He devotes attention to how the truths derived from these contemporary voices were exploited, distorted, reshaped, reinforced, or ignored by later generations of novelists, journalists, filmmakers, dramatists, and even historians with differing agendas over the course of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His cast of characters includes John Henry, Frederick Law Olmsted and John Brown, Andrew Johnson and Zebulon Vance, and those who later interpreted their stories -- John Fox and John Ehle, Thomas Wolfe and Charles Frazier, Emma Bell Miles and Harry Caudill, Carter Woodson and W. J. Cash, Horace Kephart and John C. Campbell, even William Faulkner and Flannery O'Connor. Their work and that of many others have contributed much to either our understanding -- or misunderstanding -- of nineteenth century Appalachia and its place in the American imagination.

 

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Buffalo dance: the journey of York

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Having given us Affrilachia, a best-selling collection about growing up black in Appalachia, Walker crafts a narrative in the voice of York, the slave who accompanied Lewis and Clark. Read full review

Review: Buffalo Dance: The Journey of York

User Review  - Kathy - Goodreads

Love the way Walker envisions York's voice out of plain language and beautiful turns of phrase. Read full review

Contents

Wind Talker
1
Work Ethic
3
Gods House
4
Primer
6
At Ease
8
Sundays and Christmas
9
Calendar
11
Her Current
12
Vision Quest
39
Vision Quest II
40
Ananse
42
Mythology
43
Earth Tones
44
Sweat Lodge
45
Doubt
47
Cold Hearted
49

Medicine Men
13
Spirit Mound
15
Wasicum Sapa
16
Winter Leaf
17
Buffalo Dance
18
No Offense
20
Leading Men
22
Domestique
23
Work Song
24
Perfume
25
Black Magic
26
Sandstone Thighs
27
Mouths and Waters
28
The Portage
29
Sun Son
30
Double Yolks
31
Ornithologists
33
Swap Meet
34
Promises
35
Nomenclature
36
Respect House
37
Prosperity
38
Sad Eye
50
Aurora Borealis
51
Electorate
52
Winter with Jonah
53
Majesty
54
Pomps Tower
55
The Little Sneeze
56
York Haichu
57
Pastry Chefs
58
Unravel
59
Revisionist History
61
Monticello
62
Souvenir
63
Just Rewards
64
A Love Supreme
65
Holy Water
66
Ursa Major
67
Cumulonimbus
68
Birth Day
70
About the Author
71
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Frank X Walker is a native of Danville, Kentucky, and the author of 'Affrilachia', 'Buffalo Dance', 'Black Box', 'When Winter Come' and 'Isaac Murphy: I Dedicate This Ride'. A founding member of the Affrilachian Poets, Walker coined the word Affrilachia to make visible the black experience in the Appalachian South. He is Associate Professor of English at the University of Kentucky.

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