Building Change of Use

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McGraw Hill Professional, Jul 22, 2003 - Architecture - 505 pages
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* A professional architect/contractor's guide to retrofitting existing structures
* Covers design, renovation, permits, and compliance in a logical step-by-step fashion
* Includes wide range of case studies from public and private sectors
* Hundreds of exhibits, tables, and checklists simplify project assessment and evaluation
 

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Contents

URBAN SPRAWL
1
INFLUENCING FACTORS IN LAND DEVELOPMENT PATTERNS
33
COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLANNING AND ZONING
79
DEVELOPMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY
135
COMPATIBLE NEW USES
177
LOCATING AND SELECTING REDEVELOPMENT PROPERTY WITH INVESTMENT POTENTIAL
245
EVALUATION IS PART OF PLANNING
277
SITE PLANNING AND EVALUATION
319
BUILDING PLANNING AND EVALUATION
343
IDENTIFYING COST EFFECTIVE IMPROVEMENTS AND BASIC AESTHETIC APPROACHES
429
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Page 92 - Make no little plans. They have no magic to stir men's blood and probably themselves will not be realized. Make big plans; aim high in hope and work, remembering that a noble, logical diagram once recorded will never die, but long after we are gone will be a living thing, asserting itself with evergrowing insistency. Remember that our sons and grandsons are going to do things that would stagger us. Let your watch-word be order and your beacon beauty.
Page 129 - Development patterns should not blur or eradicate the edges of the metropolis. Infill development within existing urban areas conserves environmental resources, economic investment, and social fabric, while reclaiming marginal and abandoned areas. Metropolitan regions should develop strategies to encourage such infill development over peripheral expansion.
Page 129 - The neighborhood, the district, and the corridor are the essential elements of development and redevelopment in the metropolis. They form identifiable areas that encourage citizens to take responsibility for their maintenance and evolution.
Page 130 - The revitalization of urban places depends on safety and security. The design of streets and buildings should reinforce safe environments, but not at the expense of accessibility and openness.
Page 388 - Schools (toilet and lavatories only) Schools (with above plus cafeteria) Schools (with above plus cafeteria and showers) Day workers at schools and offices Day camps Trailer parks or tourist camps (with built-in bath) Trailer parks or tourist camps (with central bathhouse) Work or construction camps Public picnic parks (toilet wastes only) Public picnic parks (bathhouse, showers, and flush toilets) Swimming pools and beaches Country clubs Luxury residences and estates Rooming houses Boarding houses...
Page 8 - Employed persons 16 years and over Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries Mining Construction Manufacturing Nondurable goods...
Page 118 - Larry C. Ledebur and William R. Barnes, All in It Together: Cities, Suburbs and Local Economic Regions (Washington, DC: National League of Cities, 1993).
Page 50 - ... entailed are made larger still and can therefore be attacked more "broadly." This is escapism from intellectual helplessness. "A Region," somebody has wryly said, "is an area safely larger than the last one to whose problems we found no solution.
Page 129 - Cities and towns should bring into proximity a broad spectrum of public and private uses to support a regional economy that benefits people of all incomes. Affordable housing should be distributed throughout the region to match job opportunities and to avoid concentrations of poverty.
Page 70 - Latino by type: 2000 data set: Census 2000 summary file 1 (SF 1) 100-percent data Geographic Area: United States.

About the author (2003)

Dorothy A. Henehan, RA, CSI, CCCA is an architect who practices chiefly in the Midwest and lives in Indianapolis with her family. She has served as an officer of AIA Indianapolis and has been an officer of the Indianapolis Chapter of the Construction Specifications Institute. She has degrees in architecture and environmental design from Ball State University where she also undertook Urban Studies. She holds CDT and CCCA certificates from the Construction Specifications Institute. She is a member of the Southern Building Code Congress International. Her wide range of project experience in both public and private sectors includes educational facilities, libraries, environmental service facilities, laboratories, military, justice, urban design, maintenance structures, multifamily housing, commercial kitchens, industrial facilities, corporate headquarters, tenant development, hospitality, medical projects, and interior services. Her work has included facilities and accessibility assessment reports, code studies, phasing plans, specifications, quality assurance, inter-disciplinary co-ordination, professional development, technical resource and site rehabilitation, and sustainability programs. Two-thirds of those projects involved renovation and about half have involved public money.

R. Dodge Woodson is a realtor, developer, builder, and master plumber and gasfitter with over 25 years experience in the conversion market in Maine and Virginia. He has authored over 70 books for major publishers. Woodson contributed his expertise in editing, real estate, building, site evaluation, and improvements strategy for this project.

Photos for this book were primarily provided by Stephen Culbert and Nick Fredericks and the authors. Stephen B. Culbert, P.E. is lead electrical engineer in an A/E firm, a former electrician, and a photographic hobbyist with considerable renovation project experience. Stephen has a keen eye to access projects with original photography that give a man on the street and a man on the roof views, illustrating the project planning and evaluation concepts discussed. Nick Fredericks is a project manager with a general contractor in Pendleton, Indiana. He has contributed construction and demolition photos that illustrate ongoing work.

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