Building Harlequin's Moon

Front Cover
Macmillan, Apr 1, 2007 - Fiction - 400 pages
8 Reviews

The first interstellar starship, John Glenn, fled a Solar System populated by rogue AIs and machine/human hybrids, threatened by too much nanotechnology, and rife with political dangers. The John Glenn's crew intended to terraform the nearly pristine planet Ymir, in hopes of creating a utopian society that would limit intelligent technology.
But by some miscalculation they have landed in another solar system and must shape the gas giant planet Harlequin's moon, Selene, into a new, temporary home. Their only hope of ever reaching Ymir is to rebuild their store of antimatter by terraforming the moon.
Gabriel, the head terraformer, must lead this nearly impossible task, with all the wrong materials: the wrong ships and tools, and too few resources. His primary tools are the uneducated and nearly-illiterate children of the original colonists, born and bred to build Harlequin's moon into an antimatter factory.
Rachel Vanowen is one of these children. Basically a slave girl, she must do whatever the terraforming Council tells her. She knows that Council monitors her actions from a circling vessel above Selene's atmosphere, and is responsible for everything Rachel and her people know, as well as all the skills, food, and knowledge they have ever received. With no concept of the future and a life defined with duty, how will the children of Selene ever survive once the Council is through terraforming and have abandoned Selene for its ultimate goal of Ymir?



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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Cheryl_in_CC_NV - LibraryThing

Smart, with original ideas, but somehow not all that memorable (it took me most of the prologue to realize I'd already read it last year). Fans of epic & classic adventure sf should enjoy it. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Guide2 - LibraryThing

Did not finish this book: stopped after reaching about halfway through. Too hard to get involved with the story. Hard to believe that future humans would behave they way they do in this book. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
17
Section 3
49
Section 4
58
Section 5
62
Section 6
95
Section 7
119
Section 8
126
Section 26
364
Section 27
366
Section 28
377
Section 29
380
Section 30
386
Section 31
395
Section 32
400
Section 33
408

Section 9
141
Section 10
159
Section 11
169
Section 12
174
Section 13
176
Section 14
217
Section 15
233
Section 16
239
Section 17
255
Section 18
265
Section 19
271
Section 20
282
Section 21
283
Section 22
297
Section 23
315
Section 24
323
Section 25
347
Section 34
423
Section 35
424
Section 36
428
Section 37
433
Section 38
437
Section 39
442
Section 40
445
Section 41
465
Section 42
471
Section 43
482
Section 44
489
Section 45
491
Section 46
492
Section 47
494
Section 48
496
Section 49
499
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

LARRY NIVEN is the multiple Hugo and Nebula Award-winning author of the Ringworld series, along with many other science fiction masterpieces. His Beowulf's Children, co-authored with Jerry Pournelle and Steven Barnes was a New York Times bestseller. He lives in Chatsworth, California.

BRENDA COOPER has published many short stories, including a collaboration, Ice and Mirrors, with Larry Niven in Scatterbrain. She lives in Kirkland, Washington.

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