Building Hope: Leadership in the Nonprofit World

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2008 - Business & Economics - 205 pages

Building Hope tells, from the trenches, what it's like to lead and manage a nonprofit agency. Filled with insights, tips, lessons learned, and poignant stories, this book will help nonprofit executives, board members, and volunteers alike leave work at the end of each day knowing they made a difference in the lives of others. With nearly twenty-seven years in the nonprofit sector, John Bateson, executive director of a busy crisis center, has seen it all. Eager to share his knowledge, he explains what it takes to lead employees and volunteers, as well as how to satisfy the other stakeholders: donors, government officials, board members and, of course, service recipients. As Bateson demonstrates so eloquently, the relationship between nonprofit organizations and all these stakeholders is built on trust, need, compassion, and--above all else--hope.

Building Hope tells, from the trenches, what it's like to lead and manage a nonprofit agency. Filled with insights, tips, lessons learned, and poignant stories, this book will help nonprofit executives, board members, and volunteers alike leave work at the end of each day knowing they made a difference in the lives of others. With nearly twenty-seven years in the nonprofit sector, John Bateson, executive director of a busy crisis center, has seen it all. Eager to share his knowledge, he explains what it takes to lead employees and volunteers, as well as how to satisfy the other stakeholders: donors, government officials, board members and, of course, service recipients. As Bateson demonstrates so eloquently, the relationship between nonprofit organizations and all these stakeholders is built on trust, need, compassion, and--above all else--hope.

But stakeholders expect a lot in return, like competence and evidence that the organization is making a difference in the community and the lives of others. Leading nonprofits competently is what this book is all about. Each chapter focuses on a different facet of nonprofit leadership: how to build a strong and effective governing board, manage and inspire staff, develop efficient and effective programs, raise money, recruit and retain talented volunteers, market the agency, manage finances, and plan for the future. Best of all, each chapter is laced with stories that hammer home a point: What happens (and what to do) when a major gift solicitation goes horribly wrong, why cultural competency is critical, and what unusual interview questions can uncover the most promising potential employees. The workload can be crushing and the stress level high in the nonprofit world. Yet being able to look around a community and see tangible evidence of success makes it all worthwhile. This book will help provide the skills--and the heart--nonprofit managers need to make a difference and build the hope that will sustain others for years to come.

 

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Contents

Starting Out The Answer Is Near at Hand
1
The Board Finding the Right Jungle
10
The Staff I Dont Do Change
22
Program Development Exactly How Much Blood Is Dripping?
36
Fundraising 101 Uncle Bob vs Bill Gates
50
Volunteers Im John and Im Nude Here
61
Marketing Cooking without Looking
71
Strategic Planning Big Hairy Dreams
83
Cultural Competency The Platinum Rule
108
Board Again Shall We Dance?
123
Staff Again Ringmaster of the Circus
136
Major Gifts Dear God Please Make Dean
150
Financial Management A Home for the Rolls
164
Advocacy Gateway to Change
178
Ending Up Where the Heart Is
193
Copyright

Fundraising 102 Crossing the Divide
94

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About the author (2008)

John Bateson has directed nonprofit agencies for twenty-seven years. In 1996, he was named a Community Hero by United Way and chosen to carry the Olympic torch. For the past eleven years, he's been Executive Director of the Contra Costa Crisis Center in Walnut Creek, California. He and his wife, Suzan, also a nonprofit executive, have four children.

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