Building Interactive Systems: Principles for Human-Computer Interaction

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Cengage Learning, Jan 7, 2009 - Computers - 672 pages
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This innovative text focuses on the architectures, mathematics, and algorithms that are integral to creating reliable user interfaces. The first sixteen chapters cover the concepts required for current graphical user interfaces, including specific emphasis on the Model-View-Controller architecture. The second part of the book provides an overview of key research areas in interactive systems, with a focus on the algorithms required to implement these systems. Using clear descriptions, equations,and pseudocode, this text simplifies and demystifies the development and application of a variety of user interfaces.
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Contents

Introduction to Interactive Systems
1
Drawing
15
Event Handling
43
Widgets
83
Layout and Constraints
107
Multiple View Models
141
Abstract Model Widgets
153
Look and Feel
173
Undo Scripts and Versions
327
Distributed and Collaborative Interaction
341
Text Input
359
Digital Ink
383
Selection
421
Display Space Management
437
Presentation Architecture
449
Web Interaction
465

Interface Design Tools
187
Internationalization
207
Input Syntax Specification
221
2D Geometry
243
Geometric Transformations
271
Interacting with Geometry
291
Cut Copy Paste Drag and Drop
313
Physical Interaction
493
Functional Design
527
Evaluating Interaction
543
Mathematics and Algorithms for Interactive Systems
557
INDEX
623
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Dr. Dan Olsen has been researching in interactive technologies for 30 years. He has done work in generating interactive systems, network-based interaction, human-robot interaction, and portable devices. He is the founding editor of ACM's Transactions on Computer Human Interaction and has received a number of awards for his service and research in the field. He was the Director of the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University and is currently a Professor of Computer Science at Brigham Young University.

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