Building Robots With Lego Mindstorms

Front Cover
Elsevier, Dec 6, 2001 - Computers - 448 pages

Lego robots! Mindstorms are sweeping the world and fans need to learn how to programme them Lego Mindstorms are a new generation of Lego Robots that can be manipulated using microcomputers, light and touch sensors, an infrared transmitter and CD-ROMs. Since Lego launched Lego Mindstorms in late 1998 sales have skyrocketed - with no sign of slowing down. Mindstorms have captured the imagination of adults and children alike, creating a subculture of Mindstorm enthusiasts around the world. The kits are now a staple part of engineering and computer science classes at many high profile Universities.

Building Robots with Lego Mindstorms provides readers with a fundamental understanding of the geometry, electronics, engineering, and programming required to build your own robots. Mario and Giulio Ferrari are world-renowned experts in the field of Lego Mindstorms robotics, and in this book they share their unrivaled knowledge and expertise of robotics as well as provide a series of chapters detailing how to design and build the most exotic robots. Mario and Giulio also give detailed explanations of how to integrate Lego Mindstorms kits with other Lego programmable bricks such as Scout and Cybermaster, as well as with non-robotic Lego Technics models.

 

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Hay buena información, pero utiliza componentes de la versión anterior del Lego Mindstorm.

Contents

Understanding LEGO Geometry
3
Learn about Lego Gears Summary
15
Explore LEGO Sensors
74
Building Strategies
83
s Readability
97
Playing Sounds and Music
117
Becoming Mobile
127
Expanding Your Options
153
s www brickshelf
550
Building Strategies
552
Programming the RCX
553
Playing Sounds and Music
556
Expanding Your Options with Kits and Creative Solutions
557
Pneumatics
559
Doing the Math
560
Classic Projects
561

custom sensors and tricks Buying Additional Parts
161
s Extra parts come from Solving Port Limitations
170
s Mechanical tricks Introduction
180
Finding and Grabbing Objects
199
Doing the Math
213
Knowing Where You Are
233
Use Ankle Bending Chapter 14 Classic Projects
249
Building Robots That Walk
279
Robotic Animals
333
There are currently six types of angle connectors inthe LEGO line numbered 1 to 6 In case Creating a Turtle
344
0 2 180 3 157 5 4 135 5 112 5 6 90 They Chapter 18 Replicating Renowned Droids
350
go by increments of 22 5 Building an R2D2Style Droid
359
Solving a Maze
371
Board Games
391
and plates used to make Variations
417
Drawing and Writing
441
Simulating Flight
467
Racing Against Time
513
HandtoHand Combat
525
Searching for Precision
537
Find Useful Lego Sites Variations on Collecting
543
Building Robots That Walk
562
Robotic Animals
563
Solving a Maze
564
Playing Musical Instruments
565
Simulating Flight
566
HandtoHand Combat
567
Appendix B Matching Distances
569
Note Frequencies
575
Math Cheat Sheet
577
Sensors
578
GearsWheels and Navigation
579
Index
581
57
593
333
594
441
596
106
597
511
605
75
607
547
613
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

Mario Ferrari received his first Lego box around 1964, when he was 4. Lego was his favorite toy for many years, until he thought he was too old to play with it. In 1998, the Lego Mindstorms RIS set gave him reason to again have Lego become his main addiction. Mario believes Lego is the closest thing to the perfect toy. He is Managing Director at EDIS, a leader in finishing and packaging solutions and promotional packaging. The advent of the MINDSTORMS product line represented for him the perfect opportunity to combine his interest in IT and robotics with his passion for LEGO bricks, which started during his early childhood. Mario has been a very active member of the online MINDSTORMS community from the beginning and has pushed LEGO robotics to its limits. Mario holds a bachelor's degree in Business Administration from the University of Turin and has always nourished a strong interest for physics, mathematics, and computer science. He is fluent in many programming languages and his background includes positions as an IT manager and as a project supervisor. Mario estimates he owns over 60,000 Lego pieces. Mario works in Modena, Italy, where he lives with his wife Anna and his children Sebastiano and Camilla.

Giulio Ferrari is a student in Economics at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, where he also studied Engineering. He is fond of computers and has developed utilities, entertainment software, and Web applications for several companies. Giulio discovered robotics in 1998, with the arrival of MINDSTORMS, and held an important place in the creation of the Italian LEGO community. He shares a love for LEGO bricks with his oldest brother Mario, and a strong curiosity for the physical and mathematical sciences. Giulio also has a collection of 1200 dice, including odd-faced dice and game dice. He studies, works, and lives in Modena, Italy.

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