Bulletin, Issue 97

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Smithsonian Institution Press, 1918 - Science
 

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Page iii - The date of publication is printed on each paper, and these dates are also recorded in the table of contents of the volumes. The Bulletins, the first of which was issued in 1875, consist of a series of separate publications comprising chiefly monographs of large zoological groups and other general systematic treatises (occasionally in several volumes), faunal works, reports of expeditions, and catalogues of type-specimens, special collections, etc. The majority of the volumes are octavos, but a quarto...
Page iii - Museum, presenting newly acquired facts in zoology, geology, and anthropology, including descriptions of new forms of animals, and revisions of limited groups. One or two volumes are issued annually and distributed to libraries and scientific organizations. A limited number of copies of each paper, in pamphlet form, is distributed to specialists and others interested in the different subjects as soon as printed. The date of publication is printed on each paper, and these dates are also recorded in...
Page iii - ADVERTISEMENT. The scientific publications of the United States National Museum consist of two series, the Proceedings and the Bulletins. The Proceedings, the first volume of which was issued in 1878, are intended primarily as a medium for the publication of original, and usually brief, papers based on the collections of the National Museum, presenting newly-acquired facts in zoology, geology, and anthropology, including descriptions of new forms of animals, and revisions of limited groups.
Page 1 - These seasons apply to waterfowl (including ducks, geese, and brant), and to coots, gallinules, and Wilson snipe or jacksnipe, but the close season continues on wood ducks, eider ducks, and swans. All the amendments were recommended by the Bureau of Biological Survey of the Department of Agriculture and concurred in by the advisory board, migratory-bird treaty act, before being adopted by the Secretary of Agriculture. In view of these changes it will be necessary, if we are to make our Louisiana...
Page 124 - ... antero-lateral angles; surface not areolated; front narrow, horizontal, its margin continuous with arcuate antero-lateral margins. Eyes minute, superior margin of orbit slightly or not at all emarginate. Antennules transverse. Epistome usually very short, so that the labial border approaches very near the front, leaving only a narrow space, which is nearly filled by the antennulae. The labial border is not interrupted in the middle by any projection or emargination and is continuous with lateral...
Page 186 - ... extending around to the lower surface near the mouth. The shell is usually swollen on the side over the cyst, and the anal area is depressed and distorted, with a large open orifice passing obliquely into the cyst, out of which the crab may thrust its legs at pleasure ; but is apparently unable, when full grown, to come entirely out. All the specimens examined in the cyst were females, carrying eggs, but a very small crab found clinging among the spines appears to be the male. The crab probably...
Page iii - Proceedings, the first volume of which was issued in 1878, are intended primarily as a medium for the publication of original, and usually brief, papers based on the collections of the National Museum, presenting newly acquired facts in zoology, geology, and anthropology, including descriptions of new forms of animals, and revisions of limited groups. One or two volumes are issued annually and distributed to libraries and scientific organizations. A limited number of copies of each рарег.лп...
Page 213 - ... teeth two, broad, lobate, obtuse. In large specimens a third very small tooth or tubercle behind the second. There are two forms of the male in this species. In one the...
Page 17 - Carapace xanthoid, the regions seldom well defined ; front usually of good breadth and square cut, often little deflexed ; eyes and orbits usually of normal size and form, the eyes well pigmented and the eyestalks normally movable except in certain deep-sea genera; the antennules fold transversely; antennal flagella of medium length. Epistome well denned; buccal cavern square-cut and usually completely closed by the external maxillipeds, which have a subquadrate merus.
Page 308 - Thus the two ridges of the right and left sides form together a triangle with the apex turned forwards,—a breakwater by which the water flowing from the branchial cavity is kept away from the mouth and reconducted to the branchial cavity. In very moist air the store of water contained in the branchial cavity may hold out for hours, and it is only when this is used up that the animal elevates its carapace in order to allow the air to have access to its branchiae from behind. In Eriphia gonagra the...

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