Bulletin, Issue 33

Front Cover
Geological Survey of Georgia., 1918 - Geology
 

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Page 14 - Bald, 4,768 feet, the highest summit in Georgia, is several miles north of the divide. The Appalachian Mountains area, as a whole, is sparsely settled, because the only localities suitable for cultivation are the narrow valleys north of the Blue Ridge. Two railroads, the Marietta and Etowah line of the Louisville & Nashville system, and the Tallulah Falls Railroad, cross the divide, but the area about 50 miles wide between these lines is not supplied with railroad transportation, and construction...
Page iv - Governor and President of the Advisory Board of the Geological Survey of Georgia. SIR : I have the honor to transmit herewith the report of Mr.
Page 210 - EMMONS, WH, and LANEY, FB, Preliminary report on the mineral deposits of Ducktown, Tenn.: Bull.
Page iii - Secretary of State HON. WJ SPEER State Treasurer HON. WA WRIGHT Comptroller-General HON. CLIFFORD WALKER Attorney-General HON. JJ BROWN Commissioner of Agriculture HON. ML BRITTAIN .. Commissioner...
Page 21 - ... GEOLOGY. — All of the pyrite deposits enumerated in the above localities occur in the Crystalline area associated with gneisses, schists and graywackes which are supposed to be of Archean age, and limestones of a much later age. A few deposits in Fannin and Cherokee counties are probably lower Cambrian. The pyrite deposits of Georgia show great variations in character of ore and associated rocks. It is believed that all may be classified under four general types, as follows: (1) metamorphosed...
Page 7 - ... supply this plant the present Tallapoosa and Little Bob mines were opened. The Atlanta plant was operated only a few years, and in 1890 the only pyrite-burning plant in the United States was a small one at Natrona, Pennsylvania. About that time the price of Sicilian sulphur rose from $22.00 to $36.00 a ton, and many acid plants were equipped to burn pyrite, but only lump burners were used and the Spanish ore was imported at such a low price that there was little incentive for developing domestic...
Page 187 - ... common green hornblende, quartz, plagioclase feldspar, and minor amounts of calcite. Along the immediate contact feldspar does not occur, but biotite is very abundant. The original texture and mineral composition of the rock has been greatly altered by metamorphism. Originally it was probably a diorite, but may have been an andesite or volcanic tuff. To the southeast of the narrow hornblende belt lies a great mass of granite gneiss, probably the largest in the State. The northwest boundary of...
Page 183 - ... waste rock and tailings from the mine as soon as the mill it put in operation. Brief descriptions of the deposit have been published by Eckel1 and Pratt.' Topographic relations. — The relations of the outcrop of the pyrite vein to the property boundaries and topography are shown on the accompanying property map (fig. 13) and topographic map and section (fig. 14), reproduced from NP Pratt's article in the "American Fertilizer.
Page 86 - ... the northwest side of the garnetiferous strip, magnetite fragments are abundant in the soil. On the southeast side of the red pyrite strip, toward the Buchanan-Dallas road, 100 yards or more of manganiferous magnetite formation occurs, and adjoining it along the public road near the residence of TR King, another garnet schist appears. The pyrite prospect with its northeast course, it is thus seen, lies in the center of this mineralized zone. The country rock as represented by fragments examined...
Page 181 - ... the first pyrite-burning acid plant in the South, and to supply this plant the present Tallapoosa and Little Bob mines were opened. The Atlanta plant was operated only a few years, and in 1890 the only pyrite-burning plant in the United States was a small one at Natrona, Pennsylvania. About that time the price of Sicilian sulphur rose from $22.00 to $36.00 per ton, and many acid plants were equipped to burn pyrite, but only lump burners were used, and the Spanish ore was imported at such a low...

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