Bulletin, Issue 21

Front Cover
State of Ohio, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey., 1918 - Geology
 

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Page 154 - Sandstone 23 Shale, calcareous, with shaly limestone. Limestone, dark siliceous Shales, calcareous, with shaly limestone. Limestone, hard Shale Limestone, hard Lower Mercer "In this locality the light-colored flint or upper phase of the Ferriferous member is bedded on the shaly limestone or lower phase. No separation, except an irregular bedding plane, is evident, thus suggesting that both rocks were laid down during the same general deposition period. In the above section the interval between the...
Page 185 - ... flaggy, 3 4. Coal. : . . . 3 5. Fire clay, 2 Total 10 9 At opening No. 4 a tunnel was driven into the bed through the hill, the elevation of the western end of the tunnel being 1825 feet, and of the eastern end, 1815 feet, the dip of the bed being to the south-east. The thickness of the bed in the tunnel is reported to be from 3 feet to 3 feet 6 inches. Sufficient openings have not been made on this bed throughout the Meade run basin to conclude that the bed always exists in two distinct benches....
Page 199 - The mine is from 400 to 500 feet in depth, and the seam from which the coal is raised varies from 3 feet 6 inches to 4 feet 6 inches in thickness, and has an inclination of 1 in 12 towards the south.
Page 251 - Knob horizon original rather than a secondary phenomenon due to the reactions of weathering, is evident, since the redness is persistent where the beds are hundreds of feet below the surface, as is shown by oil drillings. Such colors are entirely wanting in the lower beds of the Pennsylvanian series, and appear near the middle of the Conemaugh for the first time. It is true that reddish tints are seen at a few horizons in the lower third of the formation, but these are largely secondary, or in other...
Page 247 - From 12 to 30 feet above the Cambridge limestone is another fossiliferous horizon which is seldom more than a calcareous or pyritous shale, forming the roof of the Anderson coal. The name Portersville is chosen for this bed from the village of that name, near the eastern •Geol.
Page 279 - The lower portion is commonly more or less magnesian, breaks with a smooth surface which is sometimes lustreless, while 1. 2nd Geol. Survey of Penn. Report K p. 64. at others it is quite bright. This part is employed for the manufacture of cement at many places, and is available throughout eastern Washington county. It is the more persistent part of the mass, having been identified in Allegheny county on the Pittsburg and Steubenville pike.
Page 278 - ... limestone. Analyses of Benwood Limestone. Near Twilight. Scott's Run Lime carbonate 47.34 86.70 Magnesium carbonate 17.69 5.32 Silica 22.22 5.96 Alumina 8.57 1.06 Iron oxide 2.01 1.27 Titanium 0.21 0.07 The Sewickley Sandstone. Along the eastern outcrop of the Monongahela Series, according to Dr. IC White, a massive sandstone frequently comes into the section and cuts out all or a large portion of the Benwood and Uniontown limestones. When present this sandstone overlies the Sewickley coal and...
Page 266 - Big Sandy, where in the center of the Appalachian trough, the lowest of these beds passes into the air before reaching the Kentucky line. "No marine fossils have ever been discovered in any of the limestones of the Monongahela series, and everything indicates that the deposits are of fresh water origin. The black slates always contain fish remains in the shape of scales and teeth, but nothing is known of their affinities, because they have never been studied. The water may have been...
Page 204 - Calorific value 6,873 calories. MIDDLE KITTANNING COAL. SAMPLE AND SECTION 101. Mine of Walnut Hill Coal Company, section 13, Brush Creek township, Muskingum county. Excellent sample, about 13 by 7 inches, cut by BA Eisenlohr in August, 1902.
Page 254 - ... its identification wherever found. There are certain lithologic characteristics which are remarkably constant and they alone enable one to distinguish it from other limestones. These may be briefly summarized as follows: It is a gray or greenish-gray limestone, ordinarily in a single bed one to three feet thick. Fossils are abundant, especially crinoids, which stand out in relief on the weathered surface. The rock on fracture shows a more or less granular, crystalline texture, due to cleavage...

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