Bulletin, Issues 16-30

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Page 33 - I think by far the most important bill in our whole code is that for the diffusion of knowledge among the people. No other sure foundation can be devised for the preservation of freedom and happiness.
Page 27 - Nor am I less persuaded that you will agree with me in opinion, that there is nothing which can better deserve your patronage than the promotion of science and literature. Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness. In one in which the measures of government receive their impressions so immediately from the sense of the community as in ours, it is proportionably essential.
Page 25 - A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, constituting approximately a quarter of a full year's work.
Page 35 - A popular government without popular information or the means of acquiring it is but a prologue to a farce or a tragedy, or, perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance; and a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.—Letter to WT Barry.
Page 27 - To the security of a free constitution it contributes in various ways ; by convincing those who are intrusted with the public administration, that every valuable end of government is best answered by the enlightened confidence of the people ; and by teaching the people themselves to know, and to value their own rights ; to discern and provide against invasions of them ; to distinguish between oppression and the necessary exercise of lawful authority, between burthens proceeding from a disregard to...
Page 14 - AFOOT and light-hearted I take to the open road, Healthy, free, the world before me, The long brown path before me leading wherever I choose. Henceforth I ask not good-fortune, I myself am good-fortune, Henceforth I whimper no more, postpone no more, need nothing, Done with indoor complaints, libraries, querulous criticisms, Strong and content I travel the open road.
Page 15 - To where the grown-up river slips Into the sea among the ships, To where the roads on either hand Lead onward into fairy land, Where all the children dine at five, And all the playthings come alive.
Page 32 - The whole people must take upon themselves the education of the whole people and must be willing to bear the expense of it.
Page 27 - The good Education of Youth has been esteemed by wise Men in all Ages, as the surest Foundation of the Happiness both of private Families and of Common-wealths.
Page 26 - Rooms that have been occupied by consumptives should be thoroughly cleaned, scrubbed, whitewashed, painted, or papered before they are again occupied. Carpets, rugs, bedding, etc., from rooms which have been occupied by consumptives, should be disinfected.

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