Bulletin, Issue 160; Issue 168; Issue 170; Issue 173

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1918
 

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Page 200 - BULLETIN 3. The coke industry of the United States as related to the foundry, by Richard Moldenke.
Page 150 - The Bureau of Mines, in carrying out one of the provisions of its organic act— to disseminate information concerning investigations made — prints a limited free edition of each of its publications. When this edition is exhausted, copies may be obtained at cost price only through the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, DC The Superintendent of Documents is not an official of the Bureau of Mines.
Page 16 - Thus if a mixture of good and poor conductors, in a neutral state, be dropped upon a highly charged conducting surface, the good conductors immediately receive a charge similar to that of the surface and are repelled, while the poor conductors are much more loath to receive the charge and therefore not so readily repelled. If, however, a material charged to a high potential of the opposite sign be fed to the abovementioned surface, the good conductors, as before, assume immediately the condition...
Page 6 - Schedule of domestic metallurgical manganese ore prices per unit of metallic manganese per ton of 2,240 pounds for manganese ore produced and shipped from all points in the United States west of South Chicago, 111. This schedule does not include chemical ores as used for dry batteries, etc. Following prices are on the basis of delivery, fob cars South Chicago, and are on the basis of all-rail shipments. When shipped to other destination than Chicago, the freight rate per gross ton from shipping point...
Page 187 - molten spiegel mixture" for deoxidation and recarburization ; (2) the practice of melting and refining the steel bath so as to insure a comparatively high residual manganese content, say, 0.3 per cent Mn; (3) the use of manganese alloys containing silicon. In selecting plants for investigating these practices two points were kept in mind. The plant should have either "ordinary...
Page 6 - Cement Plant. — In order that an idea of the arrangement of a cement mill may be gotten, Fig. 6 showing a plan and vertical section of the Hudson Portland Cement Company's plant has been inserted. THE WET PROCESS OF MANUFACTURE 348. General. — By far the larger portion of the cement manufactured in the United States is made by the dry process. Under favorable conditions, however, the wet process is successfully and economically employed. The raw materials most commonly used in the wet process...
Page 157 - ... two-stage process. Nearly every manufacturer of ferrotungsten has tried to tap it from the furnace, but none has continued the practice. If the tungsten is reduced to 55 to 60 per cent., the alloy can be tapped, even with carbon as low as 0.2 per cent. With tungsten at 70 per cent., metal containing 0.9 per cent, carbon has run out while pouring slag, but generally any metal which comes out with the slag will contain 1.25 per cent, carbon. The irregularity of tapping operations with ferrotungsten...
Page 11 - Portland cement contains approximately 60 to 70 per cent lime, 20 to 25 per cent silica, and 5 to 12 per cent alumina and iron oxides.
Page 27 - It has been established that the ratio between the percentage of lime and the combined percentages of silica, alumina, and iron should be within the limits 1 to 1.8 and 1 to 2.2.
Page 186 - ... and is supposed to promote plasticity, at least in ordinary steels, at rolling temperatures. Silicon and aluminum, on the other hand, increase...

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