Bulletin, Issue 6

Front Cover
The Survey, 1918 - Birds - 238 pages
 

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Page 131 - B. Bradford, Printer. 1892. HATCH, PL— The Geological and Natural History of Minnesota. First Report of the State Zoologist, accompanied with notes on the Birds of Minnesota, by Dr. PL Hatch. Henry F. Nachtrieb, State Zoologist. June, 1892. Minneapolis: Harrison & Smith, Printers. 1892. OSBORN, HERBERT. — A Partial Catalogue of the Animals of Iowa Represented in the collection of the Department of Zoology and Entomology of the Iowa Agricultural College. Prepared by Herbert Osborn. Published by...
Page 45 - The result proves that a class of birds commonly looked upon as enemies to the farmer, and indiscriminately destroyed whenever occasion offers, really rank among his best friends, and with few exceptions should be preserved, and encouraged to take up their abode in the neighborhood of his home. Only six of the 73 species and subspecies of hawks and owls of the United States are injurious.
Page 77 - Agriculture, 34 contained poultry or game birds; 52, other birds; 11, mammals; 1, frog; 3, lizards; 2, insects, and 39 were empty.
Page 123 - From an economic point of view I consider it by far the most useful and beneficial of all our hawks.
Page 45 - ... subspecies of hawks and owls of the United States are injurious. Of these, three are so extremely rare they need hardly be considered, and another (the Fish Hawk) is only indirectly injurious, leaving but two (the Sharp-shinned and Cooper's Hawks) that really need be taken into account as enemies to agriculture.
Page 122 - Bonap. Swainson Hawk. The Swainson Hawk is probably the commonest Hawk in most parts of the West, rarely coming east of the Mississippi. It is fairly well distributed over Iowa as a migrant and nests from the central to the northern portions of the state. The Swainson Hawk nests somewhat later than the Red-tail, — in the early part of May in northern Iowa. The nest is built in the small remnants of native groves, or moderately timbered tracts, and the bird seems quite careless about its concealment....
Page 94 - Harris Hawk. This strikingly marked Hawk is an inhabitant of the southern border of the United States from Mississippi to Lower California, and south to Panama. Its admission to the Iowa list is based upon a single specimen captured in Van Buren county, near Hillsboro. Walter G. Savage writes concerning it, February 25, 1904: "Nine years ago a trapper caught one in a steel trap and brought it to me. This is the only one that I can positively identify in our locality. My father took this Hawk and...
Page 98 - It has been demonstrated by careful stomach examination that poultry and game birds do not constitute more than 10 per cent of the food of this Hawk, and that all the other beneficial animals preyed upon, including snakes, will not increase this proportion to 15 per cent. Thus the balance in favor of the Hawk is at least 85 per cent, made up largely of various species of injurious rodents — a fact that every thoughtful farmer should remember.
Page 98 - ... and 89 were empty. It has been demonstrated by careful stomach examination that poultry and game birds do not constitute more than 10 per cent of the food of this Hawk, and that all the other beneficial animals preyed upon, including snakes, will not increase this proportion to 15 per cent. Thus the balance in favor of the Hawk is at least 85 per cent, made up largely of various species of injurious rodents — a fact that every...
Page 204 - In' 1860 my. father shot one. I have not known them to occur since. There is no mistake in this owl. My father shot it in a tree standing in our dooryard one night, and it was nothing else but a Great Gray Owl." David L. Savage, writing in 1894, says: ' ' A friend in Van Buren county shot a Great Gray Owl a few winters ago. This is the only time I ever heard of this species being found in Iowa, but the identity is certain.

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