Bulletin, Geologic Series

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Department of Conservation and Development, State of New Jersey, 1918
 

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Page 77 - Practically every annual report of this service has stated that the principal difficulty with which the average settler on the reclamation projects has to contend is the lack of sufficient capital. In some cases the settler may originally have had considerable capital, but his lack of experience, or other misfortune, has operated to his disadvantage until his funds have been practically exhausted, and after he has acquired the necessary experience he is often unable to recover his standing for the...
Page 2 - GEORGE A. STEELE, Eatontown. HENRY CROFUT WHITE, North Plainfield. ALFRED GASKILL, Princeton, State Forester and Director. HENRY B. KUMMEL, Trenton State Geologist. CHARLES P. WILBER, New Brunswick, State Firewarden. OFFICE: STATE HOUSE, TRENTON.
Page 42 - Under the provisions of Chapter 252, Laws of 1907, and Chapter 304, Laws of 1910, all municipal corporations, corporations or persons diverting water, either from surface, sub-surface, well or percolating sources, or from any combination of such sources for public water supply purposes, are required to keep accurate records by meter or other approved methods of the amount of water used and to report the same quarterly to the Board, as successor to the State Water Supply Commission.
Page 3 - Governor : Sir — I have the honor to submit for your information, and for transmittal to the Legislature as required by law, the annual report of the Department of Conservation and Development for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920.
Page 42 - ... of work on its water-supply system at Keansburg, Monmouth County. This extension was requested by the company because of existing difficulties in obtaining materials and labor. EXCESS DIVERSION CHARGES. Charges for 1918. — Under the provisions of Chapter 252, Laws of 1907, and Chapter 304, Laws of 1910, all municipal corporations, corporations or persons diverting water either from surface, subsurface, well or percolating sources, or from any combination of such sources for water-supply purposes,...
Page 2 - The Board of Conservation and Development. SIMON P. NORTHRUP, President, Newark PERCIVAL CHRYSTIE High Bridge NELSON B. GASKILL Trenton CHARLES LATHROP PACK, Lakewood STEPHEN PFEIL Camden EDWARD S. SAVAGE, Rahway GEORGE A. STEELE Eatontown HENRY CROFUT WHITE North Plainfleld ALFRED GASKILL, Princeton State Forester and Director HENRY B.
Page 54 - Trace the development of methods of warfare through the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Civil War, the Spanish-American War, and the World War, and make some statement concerning the probable methods of future warfare.
Page 71 - The situation and the opportunity have been presented in various way?. yet the Board welcomed a request made by the Governor for a report with recommendations. Careful studies were made during the spring and summer and a detailed report submitted. In that it was shown that the State contains upwards of a million, and a quarter acres of land not now cultivated but capable of producing profitable crops under modern farming methods ; that approximately 400,000 acres of this land were once farmed but...
Page 78 - ... advertise our farm attractions as other States do and secure farmers by our merit. SECOND. To counteract the movement from the farms to the cities by lessening the hardships and uncertainties incident to farm life, and increasing its attractions. THIRD. To meet the labor problem in a positive way. FOURTH. To locate and list every farm , or part of a farm, that is for sale or for rent and be prepared to find a place for every man and every family that is attracted to us. FIFTH. To inaugurate actively...
Page 11 - ... end that the State shall develop socially and industrially as well as agriculturally the following statements and recommendations are made. OUR UNPRODUCTIVE LAND On the basis of the facts and figures presented in the appendix to this report it is apparent that there are within the State of New Jersey upwards of a million and a quarter acres of land not now cultivated, but capable of producing profitable crops under modern farming methods. Approximately 400,000 acres of this land have been farmed...

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