Bulletin of the Pan American Union, Volume 47

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1918 - America
 

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Page 7 - The settlement of every question, whether of territory, of sovereignty, of economic arrangement, or of political relationship, upon the basis of the free acceptance of that settlement by the people immediately concerned, and not upon the basis of the material interest or advantage of any other nation or people which may desire a different settlement for the sake of its own exterior influence or mastery.
Page 85 - Let us have faith that right makes might, and in that faith let us to the end dare to do our duty as we understand it.
Page 626 - Statesman, yet friend to Truth! of soul sincere, In action faithful, and in honour clear; Who broke no promise, served no private end, Who gained no title, and who lost no friend ; Ennobled by himself, by all approved, And praised, unenvied, by the Muse he loved.
Page 7 - States in their relations with one another; to the end that all promises and covenants may be sacredly observed, no private plots or conspiracies hatched, no selfish injuries wrought with impunity, and a mutual trust established upon the handsome foundation of a mutual respect for right.
Page 4 - I am happy to draw apart with you to this quiet place of old counsel in order to speak a little of the meaning of this day of our nation's independence. The place seems very still and remote. It is as serene and untouched by the hurry of the world as it was in those great days long ago when General Washington was here and held leisurely conference with the men who were to be associated with him in the creation of a nation. From these gentle slopes they looked out upon the world and saw it whole,...
Page 7 - There can be but one issue. The settlement must be final. There can be no compromise. No halfway decision would be tolerable. No halfway decision is conceivable. These are the ends for which the associated peoples of the world are fighting and which must be conceded them before there can be peace: I.
Page 7 - What we seek is the reign of law, based upon the consent of the governed and sustained by the organized opinion of mankind.
Page 7 - The establishment of an organization of peace which shall make it certain that the combined power of free nations will check every invasion of right and serve to make peace and justice the more secure by affording a definite tribunal of opinion to which all must submit and by which every international readjustment that cannot be amicably agreed upon by the peoples directly concerned shall be sanctioned.
Page 4 - It is for that reason that we cannot feel, even here, in the immediate presence of this sacred tomb, that this is a place of death. It was a place of achievement. A great promise- that was meant for all mankind was here given plan and reality.
Page 4 - They entertained no private purpose, desired no peculiar privilege. They were consciously planning that men of every class should be free and America a place to which men out. of every nation might resort who wished to share with them the rights and privileges of free men. And we take our cue from them — do we not? We intend what they intended. We here in America believe our participation in this present war to be only the fruitage of what they planted. Our case differs from theirs only in this,...

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