Bulletin of the Pan American Union, Volume 46

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Page 799 - ... be subject to a fine of not more than $2,000 or imprisonment for not more than one year, or both.
Page 700 - The whole family of nations will have to guarantee to each, nation that no nation shall violate its political independence or its territorial integrity. That is the basis, the only conceivable basis, for the future peace of the world...
Page 512 - That said park shall be under the exclusive control of the Secretary of the Interior, whose duty it shall be, as soon as practicable, to make and publish such rules and regulations not inconsistent with the laws of the United States as he may deem necessary or proper for the care, protection, management, and improvement of the same...
Page 512 - Such regulations being primarily aimed at the freest use of the said park for recreation purposes by the public...
Page 366 - Rainier, 300 miles to the north. But this was ages ago. No human eyes ever saw Mount Mazama. Long before man came the entire upper part of it in some titanic cataclysm fell in upon itself as if swallowed by a subterranean cavern, leaving its craterlike lava sides cut sharply downward into the central abyss. What a spectacle that must have been ! The first awful depth of this vast hole no man can guess. But the volcano was not quenched. It burst up through the collapsed lavas in three places, making...
Page 700 - I yesterday received a quotation from a paper in Guadalajara which stated that thirteen of our battleships had been sunk off the Capes of the Chesapeake. You see how dreadful it is to have people so radically misinformed. It was added that our Navy Department was withholding the truth with regard to these sinkings. I have no doubt that the publisher of the paper published that in perfect innocence without intending to convey wrong impressions, but it is evident that allegations of that sort proceed...
Page 700 - Therefore, everyone of us, it seems to me, owes it as a patriotic duty to his own country to plant the seeds of trust and of confidence instead of the seeds of suspicion and variety of interest That is the reason that I began by saying to you that I have not had the pleasure of meeting a group of men who were more welcome than you are, because you are our near neighbors. Suspicion on your part or misunderstanding on your part distresses us more than we would be distressed by similar feelings on the...
Page 780 - Now passed a cascade, then a whirlpool, then a smooth majestic river, then a series of rapids, tossing their waves like a stormy sea ; now rolling into lurid caverns, the roofs of which were hung with red-hot stalactites, and then under arches which it had thrown over itself in sportive triumph.
Page 494 - The Way of the Martyrs', and this a monument to their memory. "Again, the New Mexico missions were built by the hands of Indian workmen. Into them was wrought the character of that remarkable race. Their buildings came from the soil. You see their architectural motives in the mesas and cliffs on which, and of which, their towns were built. The long history of that race is in this building. It is a tribute to their life in nature. "Again, it embodies the finest elements of the churches in which our...
Page 700 - Mexico was at every point based upon this principle, that the internal settlement of the affairs of Mexico was none of our business; that we had no right to interfere with or to dictate to Mexico in any particular with regard to her own affairs. Take one aspect of our relations which at one time may have been difficult for you to understand : When we sent troops into Mexico, our sincere desire was nothing else than to assist you to get rid of a man who was making the settlement of your affairs for...

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