Bullying: From Backyard to Boardroom

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Paul McCarthy
Federation Press, 2001 - Aggressiveness - 146 pages
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Bullying doesn't stop at school. Adult life creates its own pressures, particularly in the workplace. Some people habitually, some occasionally, use inappropriate means to achieve their ends. Always there are victims-at work, in clubs, in families-and their numbers seem to be increasing. Research shows bullying to be astonishingly widespread and with high human and financial costs. For example, research indicates that between 25% and 50% of workers are likely to experience workplace bullying at some point during their career, and that 40% of those frequently bullied have been driven to contemplate suicide. Bullying: From Backyard to Boardroom describes and explains the modern phenomenon of bullying, providing valuable insight into the scale of the problem and the many ways and settings in which bullying occurs in Australia. It shows that bullying is always the personal behaviour choice of the bully, but an organisation's choice of structure and culture also impacts upon the incidence of bullying. The book shows how bullies thrive in some organisations and wilt in others. It contains moves and means to counter bullying, including policies, management strategies and legal remedies. Bullying: From Backyard to Boardroom is written in a clear and concise style. It is a practical book based on current research and the best theoretical frameworks. It is a useful resource for professionals who need to address bullying, for those experiencing bullying, and for those providing support to someone being bullied.
 

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ALASKA IS A PRIME PLACE FOR BULLYING ON A COMMUNITY WIDE STATE WIDE FRONT. WHOLE COMMUNITIES PICK ON A SINGLE INDIVIDUAL LITTLE BY LITTLE BY LITTLE UNTIL IT BECOMES SO WIDESPREAD AND SO HORRIFIC. CHURCHES POLICE EVERYONE IS INVOLVED AND IF THE PERSON FIGHTS BACK THE SINGLE INDIVIDUAL IS MOWED DOWN BY THE COWARDLY HOARDES OF ALASKAN COMMUNITY THUGS . SO WHERE IS GOD IN ALL OF THIS CERTAINLY NOT IN THE CHURCHES OF THE TARGETTED PERSONS COMMUNITY NO NOT THERE, DOES GOD RESIDE ANY WHERE ELSE NO GOD DOES NOT SHOW HIMSELF IN ANY OF THESE SO CALLED CHRISTIAN COMMUNITIES OF ALASKA. ALASKAN THUGS ARE AS NUMEROUS AS COCKROACHES AND TWICE AS UGLY. SO IF YOU WANT TO LIVE IN PEACE AND HARMONY , PICK SOMEWHERE ELSE BECAUSE ALASKA IS NOT THE WONDERFUL PLACE THAT YOU HAVE HEARD ABOUT. ALASKA IS THE ARM PIT OF AMERICA. 

Contents

Bullying in Schools and in the Workplace
1
Bullying in the Helping Professions
23
Cultures of Secrecy Abuse and Bullying
44
The Reluctant Executioners
63
The Bullying Syndrome
86
Health and Safety Guidelines to Address
101
Eliminating Professional Abuse by Managers
121
Index
140
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

JUN'ICHIRO TANIZAKI was born in central Tokyo in 1886. After becoming an overnight celebrity with his literary debut in 1910, he produced a steady stream of novels, short stories, essays, plays, poetry, and translations for the next fifty-five years. His versatility is further demonstrated by the
film scenarios he wrote for a Yokohama studio in 1920-21. The 1923 Tokyo earthquake forced him to move to the Kansai region, where he chose to remain for most of the rest of his life. Trips to Korea and China in 1918 and to Shanghai in 1926 were his only overseas experiences. By 1948, when he
completed The Makioka Sisters, he was widely considered the preeminent Japanese novelist. In 1949 he received the Order of Culture, the highest honor the emperor can bestow on an artist.
He married three times; his third wife, Matsuko, shared the last thirty years of his life. Even in his seventies he was still startling readers with audacious fiction like The Key and Diary of a Mad Old Man, and a year before his death in Atami in 1965 he was elected to the American Academy and
Institute of Arts and Letters, the first Japanese to be so honored.
Translations of his work began to appear as early as 1917, and by now his novels have been published in at least twenty different languages. Donald Keene's assessment appears to be coming true: "It is likely that if any one writer of the period will stand the test of time and be accepted as a figure
of world stature, it will be Tanizaki."
ANTHONY H. CHAMBERS, Professor of Japanese at Arizona State University, has translated a number of classical and modern writers. His Tanizaki translations include Naomi, Arrowroot, The Reed Cutter, TheSecret History of the Lord of Musashi, and Captain Shigemoto's Mother. He is the author of The
Secret Window: Ideal Worlds in Tanizaki's Fiction.
PAUL McCARTHY, Professor of Comparative Cultures at Surugadai University, has translated Tanizaki's "The Little Kingdom," "Professor Rado," Childhood Years, and A Cat, a Man, and Two Women, which won the Japan-America Friendship Commission Prize. He has also translated Takeshi Umehara's Lotus and
Other Tales of Medieval Japan and Zenno Ishigami's Disciples of the Buddha.

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