Bullying: Effective Strategies for Long-term Improvement

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Psychology Press, 2002 - Education - 219 pages
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Bullying: Effective Strategies for Long Term Improvement tackles the sensitive issue of bullying in schools and offers practical guidance on how to deal successfully with the issue in the long term.
The authors examine how bullying begins, the impact of bullying on the victimised child, and how the extent of bullying in schools can be reliably measured and assessed. They go on to explain how to set up anti-bullying initiatives which will maintain their effectiveness over the years. The complexity of the bullying process is emphasised throughout, but care is taken to outline clearly the actions that can be taken which will substantially reduce bullying in the long term.
The book is an outcome of over 10 years research into bullying. The authors draw on their own major studies and international research to provide real workable solutions to the problem of bullying, which are illustrated by case study examples throughout. The book is essential reading for school managers, teachers, student teachers and researchers determined to tackle the issues of bullying head on.
 

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Contents

The emergence of bullying
17
The social basis of bullying
29
How much bullying? Assessment and measurement
49
The experiences of those who are bullied
71
Changing cultures
91
Managing the antibullying project in school
108
Preventing and responding to bullying behaviour
127
where are we now?
156
the limits of current knowledge
176
measuring bullying with
184
References
195
Index
208
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About the author (2002)

David Thompson is a general building contractor who has lived in the Yukon Territory since 1962. His love for the land and its people has inspired him to write short stories describing life in the Yukon. He has twice won Dawson City's "Authors on Eighth" writing contest for short story fiction and has had stories published in local newspapers. David lives in Whitehorse with his wife Wendy, a Montessori teacher, two children Adam and Shawna, son-in-law Gary and two grandsons, Cameron and Jordon.

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