Bungalow Kitchens

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Gibbs Smith, Sep 1, 2009 - Architecture
1 Review
Filled with handsome photographs of retro-style kitchens, this is a what to book for those who want to learn how to restore or re-create a bungalow-era kitchen. It is filled with invaluable information describing what was in these kitchens, when it was available, and how it went together. You will be inspired to re-create the Bungalow aesthetic of old while enjoying contemporary conveniences.
 

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This book contains all the information that anyone would need to create an authentic bungalow kitchen, or, a bungalow-inspired kitchen. I have helped friends plan their kitchens, using this book, & we have scarcely had to do more than just pick one!
The photographs are beautiful & the prose entertaining & enlightening. I have read it cover to cover several times & often open it to gaze at the photos & dream of my future bungalow kitchen.
 

Contents

II
9
III
13
IV
31
V
51
VI
107
VII
131
VIII
139
IX
148
X
160
Copyright

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Page 10 - Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.
Page 16 - ... the mantel-piece has been regarded as an acquisition, and not as a nuisance ; though one doesn't see any reason, in the nature of things, why it should be regarded as one more than the other. It cannot be too often remembered that every additional object in a house requires additional dusting, cleaning, repairing, and lucky are you if its requirements stop there.
Page 16 - Ample cupboard space for all china should be provided near the sink to do away with unnecessary handling and the same cupboard, which should be an actual structural feature of the kitchen, should contain drawers for table linen, cutlery and smaller utensils, as well as a broad shelf which provides a convenient place for serving.
Page 6 - There are many people and organizations without whom this book would not have been possible.
Page 16 - It is the room where the housewife, or the servant-maid, must be for the greater part of her time day after day, and the very first requisites are that it should be large enough for comfort, well ventilated and full of sunshine, and that the equipment for the work that is to be done should be ample and of good quality, and, above all, intelligently selected.
Page 16 - KITCHEN planning such a house it should come in for the first thought instead of the last and its use as a dining room as well as a kitchen should be carefully considered. The hooded range should be so devised that all odors of cooking are carried off and the arrangement and ventilation should be such that this is one of the best aired and sunniest of all the rooms in the house. Where social relations and the demands of a more complex life make it impossible for the house...
Page 16 - ... by his wife and daughter in sewing that there was before. But he is ignorant of human nature. To his surprise he finds that there is no difference in the time. The difference is in the plaits and flounces — they put ten times as many on their dresses. Thus we see how little external reforms avail. If the desire for simplicity is not really present, no labor-saving appliances will make life simpler.
Page i - Almost anyone knows how to create an attractive living room but to work out a kitchen which is equally a 'winner' is a far more unique achievement.
Page 10 - Armed with the information in this book, you should be able to restore or re-create a period kitchen.

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