Burden or benefit?: imperial benevolence and its legacies

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Indiana University Press, 2008 - Business & Economics - 229 pages
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In the name of benevolence, philanthropy, and humanitarian aid, individuals, groups, and nations have sought to assist others and to redress forms of suffering and deprivation. Yet the inherent imbalances of power between the giver and the recipient of this benevolence have called into question the motives and rationale for such assistance. This volume examines the evolution of the ideas and practices of benevolence, chiefly in the context of British imperialism, from the late 18th century to the present. The authors consider more than a dozen examples of practical and theoretical benevolence from the anti-slavery movement of the late 18th century to such modern activities as refugee asylum in Europe, opposition to female genital mutilation in Africa, fundraising for charities, and restoring the wetlands in southern, post-Saddam Iraq.

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Contents

A Short History of Imperial Benevolence
13
Thomas Fowell Buxton and the Networks
31
Benevolence Slavery and the Periodicals
61
Copyright

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