Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau). no. 19, 1917, Issue 19

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1917
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Page 58 - Annual Report of the Registrar General of Births, Deaths, and Marriages in England and Wales (1910).
Page 29 - VII. THE PUERPERAL STATE.* 134. Accidents of pregnancy.* 135. Puerperal hemorrhage.* 136. Other accidents of labor.* 137. Puerperal septicemia.* 138. Puerperal albuminuria and convulsions.* 139. Puerperal phlegmasia alba dolens, embolus, sudden death.* 140. Following childbirth (not otherwise defined).* 141. Puerperal diseases of the breast.* VIII. DISEASES OF THE SKIN AND OF THE CELLULAR TISSUE. 142. Gangrene. 8 143. Furuncle.
Page 8 - The low standards at present existing in this country result chiefly from two causes: (1) General ignorance of the dangers connected with childbirth and of the need for proper hygiene and skilled care in order to prevent them; (2) difficulty in the provision of adequate care due to special problems characteristic of this country.
Page 24 - Like other essentials of hygiene and preventive medicine these principles are at last becoming, public property instead of being the exclusive possession of physicians. But in this case progress has been very slow. Knowledge of the need for good care at childbirth is essential; the lack of such knowledge and of a demand for this care has been, probably, the chief factor in producing the present indifference to this phase of preventive medicine. The husbands of women bearing children do not realize...
Page 25 - Knowledge of the need for good care at childbirth is essential ; the lack of such knowledge and of a demand for this care has been, probably, the chief factor in producing the present indifference to this phase of preventive medicine. Communities are still to a great extent indifferent to or ignorant of the number of lives of women lost yearly from childbirth.
Page 27 - States which already have established nurses, the growth of this work will be watched with the greatest interest. 2. An accessible county center for maternal and infant welfare at which mothers may obtain simple information as to the proper care of themselves during pregnancy as well as of their babies. 3. A county maternity hospital, or beds in a general hospital, for the proper care of abnormal cases and for the care of normal cases when it is convenient for the women to leave their homes for confinement....
Page 8 - In the country inaccessibility of any skilled care, due to pioneer conditions, is a chief factor. " Improvement will come about only through a general realization of the necessity for better care at childbirth. If women demand better care, physicians will provide it, medical colleges will furnish better training in obstetrics, and communities will realize the vital importance of community measures to insure good care for all classes of women.
Page 25 - The second fundamental cause of the high death rates from childbirth in this country previously spoken of — that is, the difficulty of obtaining adequate care — is seen to depend to a large extent on the first, the general ignorance of need for good care. As women, their husbands, physicians, and communities realize the absolute need of skilled care for the prevention of needless deaths from childbirth, methods for providing such care will be developed. In this development special problems will...
Page 25 - Transactions of the American Association for Study and Prevention of Infant Mortality have emphasized the same facts.
Page 24 - Williams1 speaks of the small fees usually paid for maternity care and says that "doctors who are obliged to live from their practice can not reasonably be expected to give much better service than they are paid for." Naturally enough, the lack of interest of physicians in obstetrics is partly due to this fact. No doubt another reason why many able physicians dislike this branch of practice is the fact that they feel strongly the responsibility assumed in the care of women at childbirth; yet they...

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