Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau). no. 88, 1921, Issue 88

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1921
 

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Page 7 - Oaken to check and control this slaughter of tbe innocents.2 SCOPE AND METHOD OF THE SURVEY. Selection of counties. — A county in the southern part of the State, where some public health work had already been done by the Mississippi State Board of Health, in cooperation with the International Health Board (formerly the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission), was chosen as the field for a series of children's health conferences, which included the examination by a Government physician of children under...
Page 11 - The report states further that the exclusive cultivation of cotton exhausted the humus and other elements of fertility. Since the Civil War the exhaustion of these lands had been more rapid than ever before, and careless terracing or circling of the hill slopes had caused many of them to wash out badly. It was only within the past few years that agricultural methods had begun to show improvement. Climate. — Hot weather usually continues unbroken from the latter part of May to early October, and...
Page 17 - Salaries of these part-time officers varied from $150 to $1,800 a year. The officer of the county studied received about $300 a year. In reviewing the results of this type of organization the secretary of the State board of health wrote as follows : In many of the counties the part-time man achieves results for which he is by no means compensated. In the main, the part-time county health officers of Mississippi have been, so far as the system will permit, reasonably effective public-health workers....
Page 16 - ... and promoted cooperative seed buying and the cooperative sale of farm products. PUBLIC HEALTH WORK IN THE COUNTY. The county was at the time of this survey the unit of administration in public-health work in Mississippi. One of the physicians resident in a county was appointed as health officer. His duties were to make monthly statements of mortality statistics compiled from the reports of the registrars of the various voting precincts of the county, to enforce quarantine regulations, and to...
Page 9 - ... two, one was about 7. the other about 9 miles from a railroad station. In none of them was there a town water supply or sewerage system. Density of population. — In 1910 the density of the rural population of the State was 34.3 persons per square mile, of the county 35.2 persons per square mile.4 In the open country it was seldom more than a quarter of a mile from one house to the next, and even in the rougher parts of the county it was unusual to visit a family who had no neighbors in sight....
Page 10 - Stations were only from 4 to 7 miles apart. None of the families visited lived more than 10 miles from a railroad station. The large markets were St. Louis and Memphis. Shipments of cotton, hay, cattle, hogs, and other produce were arranged for in carload lots by the county agricultural agent. Only a very small part of the stock and grain raised in the county was used by the local market. Roads and mail service. — On account of the many hills and gullies even the public roads were winding and had...
Page 47 - A* a rate lower than was discovered in any of the cities surveyed, but high as compared with rates for other rural districts studied. The rate found in Kansas was 40 to...
Page 10 - Thirteenth Census, 1910, Population, vol. 2, pp. 1044-1058. studied in Montana, where it was unusual to find families living less than one-half mile apart. Most of the Negroes lived on the river bottoms as tenants on the large plantations. while the whites lived in the hills where the plantations had been broken up into small farms. MEANS OF COMMUNICATION. Railroads. — Two divisions of the Illinois Central Railroad crossed the county from north to south. Stations were only from 4 to 7 miles apart....
Page 21 - One physician said that when he heard incidentally that mothers were having swollen feet and other dangerous symptoms during pregnancy, he could not convince them of the necessity of reliable medical advice, and they considered visits to him unnecessary. The board of health attributed the high maternal mortality rate in the State to the fact that " a very large majority of the confinement cases among the Negroes are attended by Negro midwives, in which case little protection is afforded the patient,...
Page 49 - One of the registered deaths occurred when the baby was about 24 months old, about 2 weeks after the mother's death. Cow's milk had been used to supplement breast milk and the baby had been given solid food some time before his death. Another baby at 2 months of age had tastes of everything the family ate. The mother said that the baby had been bitten by mosquitoes a few days before its death and she attributed death to malaria rather than to improper feeding. Another baby weaned at 3 months of age...

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