Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau)

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1915
 

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Page 20 - Accordingly most babies ought to be born " marked," if this belief is true. Manifestly this is not the case. It is not the case oftentimes even when the result has been expected. An American obstetrician of wide experience says that it is his opinion, based on an observation extending over a number of years among all classes of mothers, that the cause which was expected to show some harmful result to the baby was ineffective in ninety-nine cases out of a hundred, and that the hundredth case was coincidence....
Page 2 - The act establishing the bureau provides that it shall investigate and report upon all matters pertaining to the welfare of children and child life among all classes of our people, and shall especially investigate the questions of infant mortality, the birth rate, orphanage, juvenile courts, desertion, dangerous occupations, accidents, and diseases of children, employment, and legislation affecting children in the several States and Territories.
Page 2 - The said bureau shall investigate and report to said department upon all matters pertaining to the welfare of children and child life among all classes of our people, and shall especially investigate the questions of infant mortality, the birth rate, orphanage, juvenile courts, desertion, dangerous occupations, accidents and diseases of children, employment, legislation affecting children in the several States and Territories.
Page 2 - SEC. 3. That there shall be in said bureau, until otherwise provided for by law, an assistant chief, to be appointed by the Secretary of Commerce and Labor, who shall receive an annual compensation of...
Page 5 - The latest reports of the Bureau of the Census on mortality statistics show that slightly more than 42 per cent of the infants dying under 1 year of age in the registration area in 1911 did not live to complete the first month of life, and that of this 42 per cent almost seven-tenths died as a result of conditions existing before they were born or of injury and accident at birth.
Page 2 - ... four; two clerks of class three; one clerk of class two; one clerk of class one; one clerk, at one thousand dollars; one copyist, at nine hundred dollars, one special agent, at one thousand four hundred dollars; one special agent, at one thousand two hundred dollars, and one messenger at eight hundred and forty dollars. Sec. 4. That the Secretary of Commerce and Labor...
Page 5 - ... in the registration area in 1911 did not live to complete the first month of life, and that of this 42 per cent almost seven-tenths died as a result of conditions existing before they were born or of injury and accident at birth. Of those that lived less than one week about 83 per cent died of such causes, and of the number that lived less than one day 94 per cent died of these causes.
Page 8 - ... made. This method consists in counting forward 280 days from the beginning of the last menstrual period, thus allowing 7 days for the menstrual period, or, what comes to the same thing, counting backward 85 days. The simplest method is to count back 3 months and add 7 days, which is the average difference between three months and 85 days. In only about one out of twenty instances will the birth occur upon the exact date thus arrived at; some will occur a few days before and some a few days later;...
Page 25 - EQUIPMENT. The essential articles for the baby's nursery are a comfortable bed and the things that will be needed in his toilet. The following list will be found to include the essential items: An old soft blanket. Four dozen safety pins of different sizes. Some old soft towels. Soft wash cloths. Hot-water bag, with flannel cover. Talcum powder. Castile soap. Olive oil. Two ounces of boric acid. A crib. If desired, a clothes basket makes a good bed. A basket or bx that may readily be moved about...
Page 25 - In preparing for the new born several principles should be kept in mind. The first is that the garments must be warm without being unduly heavy ; another, that they must be loose enough to provide for perfect freedom of the muscles: the third is the desirability of perfect simplicity ; and the fourth that of cleanliness. Adornment serves no other purpose than to gratify the mother's desire for beauty.

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