Burnettizing: or the process for preventing the rapid decay of timber by the use of Chloride of zinc with a brief account of some of the other processes used for the same purpose and of the deodorizing and purifying uses of the chloride of zinc

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Printed for the proprietors of the locks and canals on Merrimack River., 1859 - House & Home - 29 pages
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Page 26 - ... fluid removes it. The solution has also been used for very disgusting privies, &c., effluvia from which, it quickly neutralizes. Mr. Henderson, the surgeon to the dock-yard at Portsmouth, has employed the fluid in a severe case of open cancer, the...
Page 5 - Payne's process was patented : it consists in using two solutions in succession, which mutually decompose each other, and form an insoluble substance in the pores of the wood. The earthy, or metallic solution is first introduced into the timber, under pressure ; this solution is then drawn off, and the decomposing fluid is forced in...
Page 29 - The quantity to be used at a time is twenty gallons for each hundred tons of the ship's measurement. " It should be poured into the air-holes of the ship, so that it may find its way by the limber-holes into the well ; and it should be thrown by a small engine, into places where it may be inconvenient to introduce it by other means. A portion may also be poured down the ship's pumps, the boxes being previously removed to allow of its free passage below. " The solution should be allowed to remain...
Page 7 - ... a sure preventive of decay, the advantages are more than sufficient, to justify its application to most kinds of timber in common use, and in situations favorable to rapid decay. It has also a distinct effect in rendering wood less liable to warp and crack, when placed in dry situations. The apparatus at Lowell consists of a...
Page 28 - When a patient dies of fever, the body should be sponged over with the dilute solution, and the clothes and bedding should be immersed and kept in a sufficient quantity of it, for forty-eight hours, before being washed. The floor should be well mopped over with the solution. Flannel, moistened with it (as before recommended), should be waved through the room. To...
Page 4 - Margary enrolled a patent for preserving timber, ropes, canvas, and other substances, by soaking them in a solution of acetate, or sulphate, of copper. This process has been...
Page 28 - Sprinkle the dilute solution over the whole of the floor of the apartment, and very slightly on the coverlid of the patient's bed. The clothes used should be immersed in the solution, and afterwards thoroughly dried. Moisten pieces of flannel cloth, and use them as directed above.
Page 28 - Let it remain about two hours in the dilute solution ; after which time it will be purified. As the dissection proceeds, the parts should be sponged over with the same.
Page 5 - The system of Dr. Boucherie accomplishes two objects : first, that of expelling the sap ; and secondly, filling the pores of the timber with a preservative solution. The mode...
Page 26 - I have employed the fluid in a severe case of open cancer, the fetor from which was intolerable to the patient and 4 attendants ; this it destroyed so long as the dressings were kept moist therewith.

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